200A and 202 reproduction
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heypete

Hi all,

First time poster, long time reader. I have a new (<1 year) 3000000923 (the "Coleman Premium Dual Fuel" lantern, not the Powerhouse, that I purchased new from the local outfitter -- the box does say "288A" on the bottom, but their website says 3000000923) that requires frequent pumping to stay lit and burning bright. I've looked through other posts here and found some helpful information, but even after trying various things suggested in those posts the issue persists.

It's only ever used CF, also newly-purchased from the same outfitter (who goes through stock pretty quick, so it hasn't been sitting around on a shelf for ages), never gasoline. The fuel has always been poured through the filter funnel that came with the lantern, and which is kept in the plastic bag when not being used so as to keep off dust.

When I follow the directions to light it (pump 30 times, hold a flame near the mantles, turn on valve fully) it lights normally as expected. It flares a bit, again as expected, for the first minute or so until the generator heats up, after which it has the usual sound and bright light.

However, it will start pulsing (see video below) after a few minutes. Additional pumping can sometimes reduce the pulsing, but it never really produces a "steady" or even "mostly steady" light.



Additionally, it requires frequent pumping to stay lit. With a full fount (filled to the point where fuel stops going in with the filter funnel, as mentioned in the instruction; it's probably a centimeter or so below the fuel filler opening) and the valve set on full brightness after 15-20 minutes it produces the same amount of light as if it were fully pumped and set to low brightness. An additional 10-20 pumps get it burning back at full brightness again for another 15-20 minutes. Once the fuel level is a bit lower in the fount, it can go about an hour to an hour and fifteen minutes between pumping before getting low enough that the flames go out.

Here's the things I've tried to fix it, all to no effect:

- Turn the valve from high to off several times to have the tip cleaner clean the generator orifice.
- Remove the generator, remove the tip and inspect it. The orifice is clean, and the tip cleaner is not broken.
- Spray the inside of the generator with a copious amount of carb cleaner. (I have not disassembled the generator yet.)
- Replace the generator (thanks OCP!), note that didn't fix it, then do the same things as above, again to no effect. Fuel sprays from the generator tip in the normal way, with nothing strange about the spray pattern.
- Make sure the packing nut on the valve is snug.
- Check and replace the fuel filler cap gasket. No leaks.
- Check to make sure the pump cup is intact and clean (it is, and the problem occurs with both the original neoprene cup and the replacement leather one I put in).
- Verify the check valve does not leak (no leaks).
- Verify the pump pressurizes the fount (it does).
- Remove the valve from the fount and examine the F/A tube. It appears to be in good working order, with the fuel hole clean and free-flowing. The Schrader valve is in good shape.
- Replace the F/A tube. (Thanks OCP!)
- Reassemble everything and check for leaks (none found) with soapy water spray.
- Make sure the air tube for the burner assembly is free of obstructions and aligned with the hole in the (not sure about the name) metal base plate under the heat shield (it's the part that's held down by the u-clip and nut).

If the lantern is turned off and pumped up, it holds pressure indefinitely (weeks and weeks), but rapidly loses pressure and pulses when turned on and running.

Any ideas as to what might be causing this issue, and how I might fix it? I know I'm out of ideas when propane seems more appealing and less problematic!

Thanks in advance!

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TSPORT
Possibly a silly question but are you closing the pump knob (rotate fully right) after you are done pumping? Air will seep out otherwise. 
Steve
Partial to single mantles & backpacking stoves (liquid fuel, of course!)
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Tgarner01
Sure sounds like you have went through everything you needed too.. you just about have to be losing air pressure through the f/a tube... Otherwise anything else would leak off when shut off... Hopefully someone can come along with suggestions.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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heypete
TSPORT wrote:
Possibly a silly question but are you closing the pump knob (rotate fully right) after you are done pumping? Air will seep out otherwise. 


Good question! I forgot to mention it, but yes, I am.
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zoomkat
Pulsing is typically caused by fuel starvation. Fuel starvation is typically caused by low tank pressure or fuel path blockage. The tank pressure can decay rapidly if the lantern stays in the "start" condition where tank air is being ported thru the opening in the top of the fuel pickup assembly. Assuming this lantern has the plastic pickup tube, blockage of the small fuel orifice in the bottom of the fuel pickup tube could cause this condition. There could be other issues (cracked pickup tube, etc.), but this would be something to check again. I have a 285 lantern and if I look thru the fuel port, I can see the small orifice in the pickup tube. If needed you probably could spray the orifice with WD-40 using the spray straw.
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heypete
zoomkat, the lantern does have a plastic pickup tube. The orifice seems to not be blocked and didn't seem to be cracked. Nevertheless, I replaced it with a new one (also not cracked and with a seemingly-good orifice) and the issue persists. I'm totally open to the idea of my having awful luck in that both tubes are damaged in some way, though it doesn't seem very likely.

I also forgot to mention it, but the pulsing and short time between pumping also exists if the valve is turned to not-full-on positions (e.g. halfway open). I haven't timed it to see if it goes longer between pumpings when only set to half brightness.
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zoomkat
If you pump the lantern up and it gets bright as it should be, then there probably is no fuel blockage in the supply line. A possible tank air leak point might be at the O-ring on the top of the fuel pickup tube. This leaked air would probably go thru the fuel supply line and not be detectable external to the lantern. Some have reported using a little pipe sealant on the fuel pickup threads and O-ring to stop possible leakage in this area. If the O-ring and O-ring sealing surfaces are ok, then this should not be needed. 
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25 502s
Hopefully you figure out the problem but if you don’t have you considered contacting Coleman?  I believe they have at least a one year warranty on their lanterns. 
Jason
not looking for any more Bday gpas. Honestly, if you have a 10-72 don’t let me know about it.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0214
Coleman Slant Saver #56
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #31
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Tgarner01
zoomkat wrote:
If you pump the lantern up and it gets bright as it should be, then there probably is no fuel blockage in the supply line. A possible tank air leak point might be at the O-ring on the top of the fuel pickup tube. This leaked air would probably go thru the fuel supply line and not be detectable external to the lantern. Some have reported using a little pipe sealant on the fuel pickup threads and O-ring to stop possible leakage in this area. If the O-ring and O-ring sealing surfaces are ok, then this should not be needed. 


I thought of that o-ring myself, but would that not leak air even with the valve off? The Schrader valve is beneath that one. Been awhile since I've been in an adjustable
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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heypete
25 502s wrote:
Hopefully you figure out the problem but if you don’t have you considered contacting Coleman?  I believe they have at least a one year warranty on their lanterns. 


I'm a tinkerer and like to figure out problems myself, so I'd like to give fixing it a shot first (plus it lets me learn more about the inside) before calling them. That said, I do know when my limits are and will call them if need be: my wife still laughs about the time I took apart a trigger assembly of a gun and couldn't for the life of me get it back together again (the fact that it launched some springs into low earth orbit didn't help), so I just put all the parts in the Paper Bag O' Shame and took it down to the local gunsmith to fix for me.
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JimL
>>Additionally, it requires frequent pumping to stay lit. With a full fount (filled to the point where fuel stops going in with the filter funnel, as mentioned in the instruction; it's probably a centimeter or so below the fuel filler opening) and the valve set on full brightness after 15-20 minutes it produces the same amount of light as if it were fully pumped and set to low brightness.

This behavior is what I would expect.  You need air pressure to push the fuel to/through the generator.  By filling the fount up so much, there's not much headspace, so pressure will drop pretty quickly as you note.  Try with the fount half full and you should be good to go for hours.  And note that there's no set standard for a number of pumps.  A full fount will be under more pressure with 30 pumps than a half-full fount with 30 pumps.  And yes, I'm ignoring the efficiency of the pump.  Some are more efficient and some less.  Pump cups aren't machined to a specific tolerance.  🙂

Pulsing would be from the generator.  If you have a spare, you can swap it out.  I rebuild my generators and do not like to see any pulsing.  If or when mine has any pulsing, I add a little bronze wool in the base of the generator.  If your generator has a dimple on it, that dimple is holding a captive bushing and the generator can be very difficult to disassemble.  If no dimple, it should be easy to disassemble and clean the generator.

Edit: 
I forgot to mention, welcome to the forum!
Secondly, the number we would use for your lantern is 288A, provided that's what it states on the collar.   I believe few of us would know the multi-digit code.  I know I certainly wouldn't.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


There is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness. - Dave Barry
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heypete
Hi Jim,

Thanks for the welcome!

Indeed, I'd expect the full fount to require pumping more frequently. But even when it's down to halfway or a quarter full, even 40-50 pumps to the point where pumping gets more difficult are insufficient to get it to run much longer than an hour or so, and even then it starts dimming noticeably after about 30 minutes, and is nearly out by about an hour and fifteen minutes. Other posts in the forum say it should run for several hours between pumps when it's not fully filled, but I haven't been able to get anywhere near that runtime. That's with the knob turned to the "full on" position. This short runtime made me think there's some issue with excess air getting into the fuel somewhere in the fount, but the problem persists even after I replaced the fuel/air tube.

I also thought the generator might be a problem, so I did swap it out, but no improvement. I didn't check for the dimple, but I'll look at the one I removed after work today.

As for the part number, I didn't see it anywhere on the lantern itself (but perhaps I need to have my eyes checked?), but there was a small mention of it on the box (which I use for storing mantles and stuff). The Coleman site had the long code on it but not the short one, which complicated things.

Thanks for the suggestions! I'm sure I can get this all sorted out with a bit of help. 🙂
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JimL
The model number should be printed on the collar, and the date of manufacture stamped on the bottom.  You can also post a picture, but I forget what the current size limit is for pics. 

Your poor runtime sounds a lot like my 229.  What an annoying little lantern it is.  🙂

I'll ask a silly question here:  You are snugly closing off the pump after you pump up the lantern, right?

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


There is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness. - Dave Barry
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zoomkat
Below is a link to the patent for the plastic fuel pickup lanterns that explains their operation and has diagrams of the parts. Bottom is a picture of the fuel pickup area where the fuel pickup tube attaches to the Schrader valve area.

https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/b4/90/cc/0021234f7e6edc/US4522582.pdf

schrader drawing2.jpg 
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Chucker
Really sounds like a malfunctioning fuel tube.

I'd inform Coleman and have them replace it as opposed to ordering a new fuel tube, removing the valve and performing the required surgery. Not real difficult but since it's so new, you deserve a properly functioning lantern.
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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heypete
Chucker wrote:
Really sounds like a malfunctioning fuel tube.

I'd inform Coleman and have them replace it as opposed to ordering a new fuel tube, removing the valve and performing the required surgery. Not real difficult but since it's so new, you deserve a properly functioning lantern.


I agree! However, I did change out the fuel tube and it didn't solve the issue. I'll keep poking and maybe call Coleman.
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heypete
JimL wrote:
The model number should be printed on the collar, and the date of manufacture stamped on the bottom.  You can also post a picture, but I forget what the current size limit is for pics. 

Your poor runtime sounds a lot like my 229.  What an annoying little lantern it is.  🙂

I'll ask a silly question here:  You are snugly closing off the pump after you pump up the lantern, right?


Ah, you're right! Somehow I missed it. It's a 285A, not a 288A as I had originally mis-remembered. Sorry for any confusion.

And yes, I am closing the pump off after I pump up the lantern. In addition, it retains the pumped-up pressure for a long time (weeks, at least) after being pumped so long as the control valve is closed.
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Gasman64
[welcome], Pete, from Pennsylvania!
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Gavercronos
I've had this issue with my Slant lanterns, the FA tube never floods and air keeps moving through it. Try giving the lantern a good side-to-side shake once it's lit.
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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heypete
Gavercronos, is there some way of knowing if the shaking has been effective other than waiting for the hour-plus it takes to see if the light output dims? Like a change in the sound of the fuel flow through the generator? I suppose if it stops pulsing that'd be a clue.

I wrote an email to Coleman describing the issue, linking to this thread, and asking if they have any suggestions. We'll see what they say.
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Gavercronos
If the pulsing stops that's probably the solution. You say you have a spare FA tube now? Block off the air hole at the top, install it, and light by preheating the generator and see if that cures it. If it doesn't your problem lies elsewhere, like maybe a pinhole next to the bung or something.
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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heypete
Interesting. Yeah, I do have a spare one (actually the original one). Any suggestions for something to block off the air hole (e.g. an adhesive or sealant that won't dissolve in fuel vapor)?

I was also tempted to run some fine wire into the fuel intake hole to enlarge it to see if that might help get a bit more fuel in and help stop the air flow after the generator is hot. Maybe I should just order a whole pile of spares at this point? 🙂

Worst case, I have a microscope and could look to see if there's a hole I'm not seeing with my eyes. If Coleman can't help (and I can't imagine they won't help), OCP has the whole valve assembly for $17 -- that's the only other part other than the F/A tube that actually goes into the fount.

After that, I suppose I'd need to start making the proper sacrifices and dances to see if that'd help.
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zoomkat
You can take the original fuel pickup tube and carefully examine the fuel orifice for any type of blockage. Do not enlarge the hole as it appears to be specifically sized for proper operation of that type lantern. Blow/suck thru the hole to verify it is not internally blocked. Next hold a little piece of wadded wet paper towel over the upper air inlet to block it off and blow/suck from either the top opening or bottom orifice to verify no blockage between the two. To check for possible cracks or seam issues between the two halves of the fuel pickup tube, block the upper air inlet with the piece of wet paper towel, cover the fuel inlet orifice with a wet finger, then suck on the open end and see if the vacuum is maintained, or is quickly lost. Be aware  that the fuel pickup tubes by them selves may be difficult to source.
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Chucker
Careful. You do too much to it and Coleman may not honor their warranty. 
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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MYN
To temporarily block off the air hole in the f/a tube, just wrap some PTFE tape tightly around it and a tiny piece of copper wire coiled over the tape to prevent it from unwrapping in the fount. You don't need a thick layer. Just one or two rounds of tape would be sufficient. Just to make sure it could still go through the bung of the fount without being obtrusive. PTFE is fuel resistant.
Some pictures of the valve and f/a assembly could sometimes tell a thousand words too. 
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heypete
MYN wrote:
To temporarily block off the air hole in the f/a tube, just wrap some PTFE tape tightly around it and a tiny piece of copper wire coiled over the tape to prevent it from unwrapping in the fount. You don't need a thick layer. Just one or two rounds of tape would be sufficient. Just to make sure it could still go through the bung of the fount without being obtrusive. PTFE is fuel resistant.
Some pictures of the valve and f/a assembly could sometimes tell a thousand words too. 


Good advice.

Here's some photos from the original F/A tube. It looks like there's a bit of a gap between the green and yellow parts at both the top and bottom. The new one from OCP also had this, so my original thought was that was normal. I tried pushing them back together (in case something got snapped apart), but that had no effect.

[SU01sNX]
[kRRCC1B]
[VAWNRpf]
[PZpJXFm]
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heypete
Hi all, 

I removed the valve again and checked the fuel/air tube, the o ring on the tube, the seating surface the o ring connects to, the valve body, and anything else I could think of. Everything appeared to be in good order.

I also removed the packing nut on the valve stem and pulled out the valve shaft. One of the two o rings had a bit of something on it, so I gently wiped it clean and ran a q tip through the tube the valve shaft connects to.

I then put a bit of Teflon tape around the air inlet on the fuel air tube, reassembled the lantern, and pulsed much more roughly when lit: 


I removed the valve again, took the tape off the fuel/air tube, and reassembled it. It pulses the original way that prompted this post.

I've contacted Coleman, but they're not answering their phones because of covid and suggested I email them. I still haven't heard back from the email I sent them a week ago.

Very puzzling indeed.
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25 502s
Maybe contact the place you bought it for a refund/replace?
Jason
not looking for any more Bday gpas. Honestly, if you have a 10-72 don’t let me know about it.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0214
Coleman Slant Saver #56
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #31
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zoomkat
Did you leak check the seams in the fuel pickup tube? Also, once the lantern is burning hot, does it still pulse if the fuel control valve is put in the half open and quarter open position? Can you throttle the output using the fuel control valve?
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heypete
25 502s wrote:
Maybe contact the place you bought it for a refund/replace?


Alas, I seem to have misplaced the receipt and they're a local company that I don't think can look up purchase records using one's credit card. Hopefully Coleman will get back to me with some ideas and will help me replace it under warranty. Worst case is I buy a second one of these lanterns and use this one for parts/emergencies. Annoying, but not the end of the world.
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heypete
zoomkat wrote:
Did you leak check the seams in the fuel pickup tube? Also, once the lantern is burning hot, does it still pulse if the fuel control valve is put in the half open and quarter open position? Can you throttle the output using the fuel control valve?


I'm not really sure how I would go about leak checking the seams. Both fuel/air tubes look like the photos I posted above, in that there's a tiny separation along the side near the ends, but both the original F/A tube and the replacement from OCP have the same thing, so I suspect it wasn't just a one-off fault.

And yes, when the lantern is hot (and the top of the fount is warm to the touch) it pulses regardless of the position of the valve. It does it all the way from full-on to barely above burning out. By adjusting the valve I can control the brightness from very bright to very dim.

For what it's worth, I also changed out the filler cap o-ring (no change).
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mnhogrider
As you stated, if you pump up the fount and it holds good pressure for an extended period of time you have no air leaks. You’re losing pressure as it’s running. The pulsing is from the pressure running low I would guess. I would zero in on the fuel pickup tube, Schrader valve and the fuel valve itself. Is the packing nut on the valve tight? The knob should turn with a fair amount of drag. Getting the Schrader valve seated in the pickup tube at the right height is critical on these lanterns. 
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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zoomkat
Looking at the video, the pulsing does not seem to be the typical fuel starvation/low pressure pulsing, which tends to be slower and more regular. When the output is throttled back, the pulsing should steady out as the fuel supply catches up with the fuel consumption. What are you using for fuel? Does your fuel possibly have alcohol/water in it? Possibly something vaporizing/flashing in the generator that is not fuel. As to checking the fuel pickup tube for leaks like an old timer, I'd just put some spit on my finger and put it over the fuel orifice, then put the valve end in my mouth and pull a suction thru the air inlet port and see if it holds.
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heypete
mnhogrider wrote:
As you stated, if you pump up the fount and it holds good pressure for an extended period of time you have no air leaks. You’re losing pressure as it’s running. The pulsing is from the pressure running low I would guess. I would zero in on the fuel pickup tube, Schrader valve and the fuel valve itself. Is the packing nut on the valve tight? The knob should turn with a fair amount of drag. Getting the Schrader valve seated in the pickup tube at the right height is critical on these lanterns. 


Exactly, it holds pressure when it's pumped up and off, but loses pressure when it's running. The packing nut on the valve itself is tight (though it's not holding any packing in: there's two o-rings on the valve stem, the nut just keeps the stem from falling out) and there's a moderate amount of drag when turning it. I had cleaned the o-rings before and wiped out the space in the valve body where they fit with a q-tip. I didn't apply any additional lubricant, lest it contaminate the fuel or be contaminated by the fuel, but I do have silicone grease if that'd help.

I don't have a Schrader valve tool, but could get one. I have two F/A tubes, the one that came with the lantern and one I bought from OCP. I haven't adjusted either, and they're both as-made from the factory. How would I go about making sure the valve is seated at the right height in the pickup tube?
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heypete
zoomkat wrote:
Looking at the video, the pulsing does not seem to be the typical fuel starvation/low pressure pulsing, which tends to be slower and more regular. When the output is throttled back, the pulsing should steady out as the fuel supply catches up with the fuel consumption. What are you using for fuel? Does your fuel possibly have alcohol/water in it? Possibly something vaporizing/flashing in the generator that is not fuel. As to checking the fuel pickup tube for leaks like an old timer, I'd just put some spit on my finger and put it over the fuel orifice, then put the valve end in my mouth and pull a suction thru the air inlet port and see if it holds.


Which video are you referring to? The video in the first post is with the fuel/air tube as-made at the factory, with no changes made. The second video a few posts ago was after taping up the air inlet in the fuel/air tube so only fuel could make it out of the fount. For that experiment I let some fuel into the generator, then pre-heated it so the lantern would start and let it run for a few minutes to warm up, then recorded the video.

The fuel is Coleman Fuel (the actual Coleman-branded stuff) purchased new at the store a few months ago. It's been kept in the closed, original canister in a dry location. I give the canister a shake or two before pouring it through the filter funnel into the fount. When poured into a glass it appears clear, clean, and without any separation that would indicate water.

I did as you suggested as for leak-checking, and the valve holds vacuum when I suck on it. If I also put my lips over the air hole in the fuel/air tube, cover the fuel inlet, and blow, no air escapes.
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zoomkat
The second video is the one I most recently referenced. It seems more erratic. The first video you posted has a slower and more regular pulsation generally associated with fuel starvation. You can get a Schrader valve tool in the auto section at Walmart that should work to remove/adjust the Schrader valve. If the Schrader valve poppet is itself limiting fuel flow, use the tool to maybe turn/move the valve out by a half a turn to allow the valve poppet to open more. You don't want to get the valve too lose so that it leaks past its seal ring. There is a sealing ring on the side of the Schrader valve core that should allow for a little adjustment. You can adjust the valve a little and then check it for seal leakage while closed before putting it back in the lantern. Be careful removing the valve as some people have reported breaking them if they are stuck. 
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mnhogrider
heypete wrote:


Exactly, it holds pressure when it's pumped up and off, but loses pressure when it's running. The packing nut on the valve itself is tight (though it's not holding any packing in: there's two o-rings on the valve stem, the nut just keeps the stem from falling out) and there's a moderate amount of drag when turning it. I had cleaned the o-rings before and wiped out the space in the valve body where they fit with a q-tip. I didn't apply any additional lubricant, lest it contaminate the fuel or be contaminated by the fuel, but I do have silicone grease if that'd help.

I don't have a Schrader valve tool, but could get one. I have two F/A tubes, the one that came with the lantern and one I bought from OCP. I haven't adjusted either, and they're both as-made from the factory. How would I go about making sure the valve is seated at the right height in the pickup tube?


There’s a balance point where the valve will let the lantern burn bright with the knob all the way open and then shut off properly. There are many complaints about not being able to shut a lantern down because the Schrader valve is to high in the pickup tube. It’s a pain to make an adjustment then put everything back together then take it all apart to maybe readjust. 
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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Chucker
BTW, if you were losing air pressure out the valve you would see fuel there also. Easy enough to rule that out. If you don't lose pressure over night for instance the problem is with the Fuel tube up to the gen. 
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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heypete
zoomkat wrote:
The second video is the one I most recently referenced. It seems more erratic. The first video you posted has a slower and more regular pulsation generally associated with fuel starvation. You can get a Schrader valve tool in the auto section at Walmart that should work to remove/adjust the Schrader valve. If the Schrader valve poppet is itself limiting fuel flow, use the tool to maybe turn/move the valve out by a half a turn to allow the valve poppet to open more. You don't want to get the valve too lose so that it leaks past its seal ring. There is a sealing ring on the side of the Schrader valve core that should allow for a little adjustment. You can adjust the valve a little and then check it for seal leakage while closed before putting it back in the lantern. Be careful removing the valve as some people have reported breaking them if they are stuck. 


Yeah, the second one was with the air intake on the fuel/air tube taped off. I'm not surprised it's more erratic. Once I removed the tape it returned to the previous state.

I just fired it up again and let it heat up for a few minutes. Still pulses. No fuel leak from the valve stem. It's been 9 days since I wrote to Coleman, with no response yet. If I don't hear from them next week I'll contact them again. Hopefully they can get it sorted out or replaced.

Thanks a million to everyone! I'll definitely keep you all posted as to what happens and if Coleman can get everything sorted out.
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heypete
heypete wrote:


Alas, I seem to have misplaced the receipt and they're a local company that I don't think can look up purchase records using one's credit card.


With the aid of my credit card statement, date of purchase, and amount of purchase, the shop was able to locate and print out a copy of the original receipt from February. Now I just need to wait on Coleman to get back to me. 🙂
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25 502s
That’s a good start. Surely there has to be a way to get ahold of Coleman. 
Jason
not looking for any more Bday gpas. Honestly, if you have a 10-72 don’t let me know about it.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0214
Coleman Slant Saver #56
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #31
Quote
Ridge Runner
Be patient with Coleman's customer service! I emailed them earlier this summer and it was almost a month before they got back to me.

— L.J.
Looking for 10/2015 & 1/2020 B-Day Lanterns
I love the smell of naphtha in the morning!
"Ain’t no need to watch where I’m goin’; just need to know where I’ve been" -Tow Mater

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MYN
During the test in the latest video(the one with the teflon tape and heavy pulsing), did you still have the rapid pressure loss as before?
I would suspect that there is an air leak somewhere at the interface between the green and yellow parts and that happens to be above the fuel level in the fount.
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Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.