200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
johnvosh
So I picked up a nice 2/81 Coleman 502 for a good price. Here are the pics! I put some fuel in it from one of my other stoves and it lit up right away. Took and decided to do a boil test. After 17 minutes and with 1 litre of water, I couldn't get it to a roaring boil. Maybe I was doing something wrong? I did this out on my deck, not much wind, outside temp was around 14c. I took a couple video's of it as well and I'll try to get them posted!

LINK to 2 video's. Listening to flame, it seems to fluctuate a little bit while running.

20190813_063134.jpg 20190813_063207.jpg 20190813_085809.jpg 
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johnvosh
Well, I ended up taking the thing apart! Amazingly the burner base came out fairly easily. I thought I was going to have a lot of problems with it, but nope. But under that the screw head were quite rusty as well as the plate the screws were holding. The burner rings were a bit stuck together. The inside of the generator looked clean when I shone a flashlight into it as did the feed tube that goes into the tank. Once I removed the collar from the tank, some of the paint was flaking, which is too bad. I am going to leave the tank alone, just wipe it down gently to make it shine again.

20190813_131027.jpg 20190813_131507.jpg 
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zoomkat
A strong running 502 will start to turn the grate cherry red. If the output is low and the tank depressurizes fairly quickly, you may have a sticking fuel control rod in the fuel pickup assembly. In the light position, the fuel control rod is down in the fuel pickup orifice allowing aa mix of tank air and fuel to be sent to the generator. When the fuel control valve is fully opened, the fuel control rod spring pushed the fuel control rod up and out of the fuel pickup orifice allowing the fuel pickup tube to flood up with fuel.
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johnvosh
zoomkat wrote:
A strong running 502 will start to turn the grate cherry red. If the output is low and the tank depressurizes fairly quickly, you may have a sticking fuel control rod in the fuel pickup assembly. In the light position, the fuel control rod is down in the fuel pickup orifice allowing aa mix of tank air and fuel to be sent to the generator. When the fuel control valve is fully opened, the fuel control rod spring pushed the fuel control rod up and out of the fuel pickup orifice allowing the fuel pickup tube to flood up with fuel.


When I lit the stove, I followed the instructions on the label. I had the red cleaning knob pointed away from the stove, then I turned the fuel valve a 1/4 turn. After about 2 minutes, I opened the valve fully and left the clean knob/adjuster in the full open position. It had a nice blue flame the entire time.
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zoomkat
If the fuel rod sticks, the stove will actually stay in the start mode. It runs (it is using a mix of fuel and air from the tank), but not as hot, and the tank will depressurize fairly quickly. My dad's 502 did this after sitting unused for a number of years. You can reassemble the fuel pickup and fuel control valve, then cycle the fuel control valve and see if the fuel control rod moves in and out of the fuel pick up orifice. On my dad's stove just the disassembly and reassembly fixed the problem without any other action. The below pictures show how the fuel control rod and the fuel control valve work together.

fuel valve2.jpg 

fuel tube2.jpg 
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johnvosh
Just wanted to give everyone an update on the 502. I've attached some pictures! It looks so good now. Just wish the paint on the font wasn't flaking. I still have to light it, which I will do tomorrow after giving the paint some time to dry fully. The burner rings were rubbed with some #0000 steel wool, but not painted. I did replace three screws as the original were quite rusty. I was going to replace the ones for the burner, but couldn't find any at my local Home Depot. Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_143706.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 163.83 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_143712.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 160.60 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_154819.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 162.98 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_154824.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 174.04 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_155938.jpg, Views: 56, Size: 162.66 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20190820_155933.jpg, Views: 53, Size: 181.92 KB
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1hpycmpr
Nice job!  For being 38 years old, the paint on the tank looks pretty darn good.
Mark
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ZRE2009
Looks like a very nice transformation. Very good job you did
Zachary E.
Delphos, OH
Looking For Anything 6-90
ICCC Member: 1760
Turd Appreciator #0219
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johnvosh
1hpycmpr wrote:
Nice job!  For being 38 years old, the paint on the tank looks pretty darn good.
ZRE2009 wrote:
Looks like a very nice transformation. Very good job you did


Thanks! I still think there is some problem with it though as after 9 minutes it still had not brought 1 litre of water to a boil. So I am not exactly sure what I should be looking at....
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ZRE2009
I really doubt it would be a problem but have you checked to see that there is no obstruction in the little fuel tube going up to the generator? Maybe try blowing that out and making sure its passing fuel freely. It looks like you had the fuel valve all the way out I wonder if a little piece of graphite didnt get lost inside that tube possibly? 
Zachary E.
Delphos, OH
Looking For Anything 6-90
ICCC Member: 1760
Turd Appreciator #0219
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zoomkat
"Thanks! I still think there is some problem with it though as after 9 minutes it still had not brought 1 litre of water to a boil. So I am not exactly sure what I should be looking at...."               

Does the output change as you rotate the cleaning lever? Maybe you can post a picture of the stove operating after operating at at full output after a couple of minutes. A good running 502 will often make parts of the grate a little red in calm conditions.
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Ridge Runner
Question: Are you adding any more air to the fount after the initial pumping?

From zero pressure, I usually start with about 20 pumps to light. Then, after running a couple minutes I add another 15-ish more pumps. Makes a difference on the output of mine anyhow, it really roars after adding the second round of air. After that it pretty much keeps itself pressurized.

Very nice job on the clean-up/repaint, too. It's lookin' real good!

-- L.J.
Don't reinvent the wheel, build a better mouse trap!
"Ain’t no need to watch where I’m goin’; just need to know where I’ve been" -Tow Mater

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fuel brained
Nice looking stove. Did you clean the generator.
Pastor Jeff
God said "Let there be light" so He let His Son shine.
SoCal and Lovin' It
US Navy Submarine Cold War Veteran
MilSpec Ops #1960 "Feel the Roar"
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johnvosh
zoomkat wrote:

Does the output change as you rotate the cleaning lever? Maybe you can post a picture of the stove operating after operating at at full output after a couple of minutes. A good running 502 will often make parts of the grate a little red in calm conditions.


Yes, the output does change. If I take and turn the red lever towards the body, it will lower the flame output. Nothing got red hot until after a few minutes of operation

Question: Are you adding any more air to the fount after the initial pumping?


Yes I am. I only have the font about 1/2 full of fuel or so, so I add about 30 pumps, then light it, wait a couple minutes, open the valve fully, then add about 10-20 more pumps.

Nice looking stove. Did you clean the generator.


Thanks. Yes I did clean the generator. The only thing I didn't clean was the small little fuel tube, so I will try doing that today.

Thanks for all the help everyone!
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mikew
Recommend covering the pot to hold heat in and speed up the boil time a little.
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05; Milspec Ops 0045
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