200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

stoves1234
I said that I had enough lanterns, then I found this 242C (1946) at a flea market for $12. I had never seen one before, so I have a few questions about it. 
  1. The fount is painted green, but it looks like brass underneath. Why do all of the 242C's I've seen on this site have polished steel tanks?
  2. What's the thread size for the screws on the air pump?
  3. The needle tip on the square rod for the air pump is gouged. Can I re-work the tip, or will a good one from a 220 fit? 
  4. Is there an O-ring substitute that I can use as a gas cap gasket until I order some stuff from OCP?
  5. I've done some research on this forum, would soaking the collar and frame in vinegar take care of the corrosion?
  6. How does this series of lantern compare to my 200a's in terms of construction and performance?

Thanks for any assistance. I wanted to get some info before I started to take this lantern apart. By the way, I also bought a 1976 Coleman water jug in nice shape at the flea market. I'm going to have to watch myself.
Jim Brizzolara
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HillCountry
I'll try to answer some of your questions that I know off the top of my head.

1. During WWII, the founts were painted rather than nickel plated to conserve nickel for the war effort. They resumed nickel plating after the war was over and production ramped back up. The 242 founts have always been brass, never steel.

2. Not sure on screw thread size

3. The air stem can be polished by inserting in a hand drill and using some emery cloth or very fine sandpaper at a proper angle you can polish out the groove with just a light touch

4. Not sure on o- ring, but just make sure it is nitrile so that the fuel doesn't degrade it

5. The collar and frame are most likely steel, so yes, vinegar will remove the rust. Check with a magnet to make sure they are not brass, just in case.

6. In my opinion, the 242 was one of the best lanterns Coleman ever made. They are light, bright, easy on fuel, don't stink and will last many lifetimes if cared for.

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask, we're all happy to help.
Tim - ICCC Member #1217
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AllanD
stoves1234 wrote:
I said that I had enough lanterns, then I found this 242C (1946) at a flea market for $12. I had never seen one before, so I have a few questions about it. 
  1. The fount is painted green, but it looks like brass underneath. Why do all of the 242C's I've seen on this site have polished steel tanks?
  2. What's the thread size for the screws on the air pump?
  3. The needle tip on the square rod for the air pump is gouged. Can I re-work the tip, or will a good one from a 220 fit? 
  4. Is there an O-ring substitute that I can use as a gas cap gasket until I order some stuff from OCP?
  5. I've done some research on this forum, would soaking the collar and frame in vinegar take care of the corrosion?
  6. How does this series of lantern compare to my 200a's in terms of construction and performance?

Thanks for any assistance. I wanted to get some info before I started to take this lantern apart. By the way, I also bought a 1976 Coleman water jug in nice shape at the flea market. I'm going to have to watch myself.


1) The "Shiny" ones you are seeing are Nickel plated and this is typical of the later 242C's
The bottom of the fount is always steel, so keep an eye out for corrosion there.

2) these are tiny sheet metal screws, not machine screws

3) Presuming the 220 rod is the same length, yes

BUT if your pump check valve is leaking the new CV you buy will likely use a smaller
diameter thread

4) I typically use round O-rings out of an O-ring assortment

5)While both of my 242C (one Nickel, one painted) have nickel plated brass collars,
many 242C's have a Zinc plated Steel collar

6)The 242's are more solidly built and don't suffer from the cheap construction
and air tube leaks of the 200's
Allan

Don't ask where the burn marks on my workbench came from...

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GForceKaras
4) nitrile aka buna n oring size #109
Thien TAS member #2750 / Sears Collectors Club #1
Looking for a Sears Ted Williams lantern (FOUND! Thanks Sean!)
"The dreams of youth are the regrets of maturity" - Darkness
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Deanofid
AllanD wrote:

2) these are tiny sheet metal screws, not machine screws

If they are for a 242 that has the 'inside' pump cap as so many of them do,
they are definitely machine screws, size 4-36.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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Gand28
#6. Best single mantle that Coleman made IMHO. As others have said, simple, superior construction and just great runners. I have 7 of them since I cant pass one up when I see it. The all use 24A Peerless mantles as the ytend to over-drive (flames showing outside) a typical 21A mantle. Maybe I just pump them too much!

Have fun cleaning it and remember to take then post pics.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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StanDahl
What they said, except, the war-time 242's had painted steel founts. I'm not sure when they went back to brass, but my 6/46 is brass. All of the 242C's were painted green until Sept. 47, then back to nickel.

I like citric acid better than vinegar as it works more gently, imo. A couple of packets of lime Kool-aid will supply enough citric acid to do the job. However, most any acid will attack the original zinc plating, if there's any left. Bead blasting is great too, as long as it's not too harsh.
ICCC Petty Bureaucrat #CMLXII...
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JimDouglasJr
The check valve isn't supposed to be a complete positive shutoff, so some leakage is OK until the stem is closed.  If it's super leaky or stuck, spray some carb cleaner in, protect the paint with awe t paper towel.  let it work a couple hours, then use the punp and pump it through.  That should clear it of any gunk. 

Painted 242s are not super uncommon, as John pointed out.
Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
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3fan
I was just given this 1944 242C from my daughter as a Christmas gift.   I love it.. but have a question for someone who knows.  As you can see the fount is still brass only (not painted or nickel plated).   It doesnt appear to have been painted like others during the war effort.   However, I still wonder if the paint was "cleaned off".   Were there many of the models left brass as this one appears to be?

lantern.jpg 
~3fan
Jayco campers and Coleman lanterns.. its the small things in life.. 
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michiganphil
It's been stripped...it would not have been shipped like that.
Philip
ICCC #1326
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Chucker
What Phil said. It most likely did have green paint from the factory. I'd paint it but that's me and I like some gpa's to be as close to factory as I can get them. Others meh, not as much. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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hikerduane
I left a P-W lantern I got recently with the worn off/stripped brass, something different in my collection.  Some look better painted though.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves and lanterns, who's counting.
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mikew
Agree with others, painted green originally.  Also appears to have been apart before due to the position of the valve.  The 242s are great lanterns.
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05 Milspec Ops 0045
Quicklite Crew #27
Perfection Heater Collectors #4
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Chucker
I think you're right Mike, over tightened valve by about 90 degrees I'd say. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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74HARLEY
Well I guess it depends on what you want, do you plan a restoration, or just want a user? Does the bare brass speak to you, if you really like it as is there is no harm in polishing and enjoying it. It's all up to you. 
Welcome from Washington!
Joe
looking for 200a 11-56,9-77,2-65 Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #0004 ICCC #1262
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #19
Frank appreciation syndicate member #9
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3fan
Thanks guys!   I love the copper found and plan on leaving it as is.   Its nice to know the story behind it though.   Its a great addition to the collection!
~3fan
Jayco campers and Coleman lanterns.. its the small things in life.. 
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