200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
smithers646
This is my second rebuild (and first post).  I bought this lantern off eBay from... someone reputable. (and I'm not blaming them at all for this.)  A Coleman 220C with a born-on of August 1945--VE month!--and I had to have it, and I had to make it work!!
Upon unboxing, I noticed what sounded like a teaspoon of sand rolling around in the fount. Well, this will get the BB treatment, and maybe recoated, I'm thinking. The fount got a good shot of PB Blaster before I went out of town for a week.

This afternoon, I started disassembly in earnest.  I drained the fount and gave it a quick rinse of acetone.  Everything proceeded smoothly, until removal of the  throttle body/FA assembly from the fount. I went with the 'inverted in a table vise' method, with the fitting gingerly clamped ONLY THE BRASS between two pieces of wood. It broke free without too much torque and I immediately smelled some weird latex paint-like smell, and a small dark green puddle formed on the floor.
As I continued to unscrew, it did not feel like proper thread movement. I flipped it back over, and...

Bum bum BUUUUUMM!  The nipple in the fount had ripped away from the fount.
20190629_200154s.jpg
Looks like JB Weld. Or maybe the dark green goo was the repair sauce, liquefied by either the PB Blaster or acetone.  Doesn't really matter- the brass is torn.
Is this even fixable?  Crop out a 1.5" circle and braze in a new plate and nipple? I'd hate to make it an electric lamp, but that's better than a non-working lantern.
I'd sure appreciate the sage counsel of this blog.  Thanks.
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macwacs
You hit the nail on the head with brazing or very carefully welding a new plate over the damaged area. Re-drill and install the valve assembly. Keep the plate smaller than the collar and whos going to see it? Of course you will more than likely have to repaint. Hope that the bottom is good with the date. Worse case the bottom could be carefully cut out and applied over a patch that would be on the inner part of the lantern. A lot of work but some times our labor has to be free if we want to preserve these things but it can be done.
 RMW
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Gand28
Spun bung. Those brass founts need to have a wrench on the hex and one on the valve. We have all learned that the hard way. 

Look for a new fount. They are out there. 

Oh, for history’s sake, 8/45 was VJ day. VE day was 5/45. 
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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scl
wrench in vise, fount hex in wrench in vice and wrench on valve, thats what i do and even did a couple agm 100 lanterns that way.
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smithers646
Gand28 wrote:

Oh, for history’s sake, 8/45 was VJ day. VE day was 5/45. 

I can't believe I wrote that! Of course it's VJ day.
The first one I did was a 220K, with a steel tank and no flats.  That one took a vice, a butane torch, and two sets of hands before it broke free.  But what worked for the 220K is not what goes for all of them.
Let that be a lesson, kids- treat the elders with a little more respect! 

And the green stuff- appears to be some sort of sealant applied to all internal surfaces of the fount.  It will of course all have to come out before I do any torch work.  Thank you all- will advise!
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austin65uri
Well, you learned what happened and why, along with some correct history.  Can't add to that, but welcome from Hawaii!  Hope you'll enjoy the forum.
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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dugan1
That green goo is probably Rug that sat in the fount over a long period of time . I find a lot of it . And by the way, my opinion ( I know you didnt ask for it lol) is replace that fount! Don't take a chance on it. One little failure of the repair and you have white gas spraying right up into the business end of your lantern, and turning it into a flamethrower.  
Brian
Albertville, Al.
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MYN
Remove all the paint and whatever internal coating and clean the heck out of it. Check for stress cracks. If there ain't any, you might be able to save it.
Brazing would be a better choice than solder or epoxy. You'll need to do a really neat job or you'll regret doing it in the first place.
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enelson14
If you're not comfortable doing it yourself, silver soldering the proper piece back in after you've got it all repaired and ready could be done by someone competent in jewelry making. Perhaps you could find a local hobbyist.
Should never have tried to rock
Should never have tried to roll
Aw but damn I don't regret
The 33 RPM Soul
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smithers646
Thanks all. I will NOT be doing the sil-brazing.  If I can't find a shop that would do it for a proof test to some test pressure, then it will become an electric lamp.  Im thinking that test pressure will be 2X the maximum normal operating pressure it will see in service, which (in my experience) is on the high side for proofing a weld repair.  I wouldn't think you could get more that 30 psi with that thumb pump, so proofing pressure would be 60 psi. 3X would be 90 psi,  and seems like that might be pushing things a bit far. (or is it?)

and whatever it is, that green goop has glued the valve body in place!  It's going to take some torch heating to get that out.
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Majicwrench
It's fun and satisfying to fix things, and I generally encourage saving stuff, but not a 220 font, not that one. Replace it, the search is fun.

And on the next one use a wrench on the bung, it's just brass.
Keith
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pagrey
If it was me, I'd order one of those 220E founts that are on our hosts site right now for $8-9 and a $3 decal. Support the store, make a runner and call it a day. You could even throw in a few mantles and generators to sweeten the deal. I guess it would be a fake but it'd still run just like a nice 220C and to me that's what counts.
Paul
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MYN
If you need to remove that green goop, leave some methylene chloride paint remover on it first. That'll swell it loose. Finish off with acetone and clean as much as possible with some alkaline degreasser and finally water rinse before drying.
That way you need not torch and char the hell out of it to avoid excessive heating of the fount, which might cause further damage.
After that, you have a clean fount before commencement on the silver brazing.
If you are finally able to apply a test pressure of 60 psi, just leave it pressurized with some fuel for a couple of weeks and see if it leaks, give way or anything like that. In between, turn the fueled, pressurized fount upside down and leave like that for a few days. Make there are no weeping fuel from any point.
And after all that, you should be able to decide better if you'd want to use it as what its intended for.
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ecblanks
I have been very fortunate not to have spun a bung (sounds like drug slang) yet.  Even then I'm very paranoid about it and don't pull the valve unless I have to, but in your case it's seems like it's good you found out "the hard way".  Sorry for your loss, and best of luck with this project.
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Chucker
Fount repairs that members have done usually are able to take 100psi. You have plenty of options above. Proceed at your own risk.

I'm with Carlton on pulling valves, if I don't have to, I don't especially on the older one's. Post 1955 or so, not such a big deal IMO. 

 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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hikerduane
Can't see spending money on this unless it was a family heirloom.  Only reason to repair would be by you for the satisfaction of fixing it.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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MYN
That'll be a tough one.
If you somehow manage to the repair it into a working lantern, I'll bet the satisfaction would be even greater than having a pristine unit.
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smithers646
Thank you all for the advice.  It is all appreciated. 
One question though:  I checked projects #3 (another 220C, A '47) and #4 (Nickel 220D, 4-1950) and neither have hex flats on the fount outlet/bung, though the subject lantern clearly did.  Is that how the founts were made originally- some with a hex of flats, and some without?  
Thanks again, all.
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Majicwrench
Are the other two font steel?
Keith
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smithers646
no, both are brass.  220C is painted.
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MYN
That could be a replacement piece. I never knew any with hexagonal flats on the port outlet bung.
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smithers646
Been a few days since I could update.  I have cropped out the top of the tank in way of the damage, and figured out a couple things:
There was no way this unit was coming back to life without pulling the FA tube.  The fount is packed with corrosion (coincidentally, the INSIDE color is almost a perfect match for the outside! 20190704_203229sm.jpg 
Nice view of the pump discharge tube though. I measured the wall thickness: 0.5mm, or about 24 gage thickness.

The FA tube would not have worked without removal and cleaning.  The air holes at the top were nearly or completely closed off, and the steel rod was glued in the shut position:
20190704_202810sm.jpg 
Note the two shades of green, with a 'cleaner' brass band in the middle.  I can see the same band on the inside wall of the fount.  Apparently, it sat for a while with something in the tank, with two different corrosion mechanisms at work. (and the one above the fluid level looks to be a little nastier than the one below).  The same is true with tractors- never store them with the tank half full.

The fitting in the fount is a replacement fitting.  And judging by the amount of sin and corruption on the FA tube threads below the fitting (inside the tank), I don't think this ever would have come apart without destroying something:
20190629_200216sm.jpg 
I'm going to try burning/picking that junk out of the joint, and then set this up in the vice for removing the fitting from the FA assembly. Not sure that will work, but we'll try.
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smithers646
Great advice from several of you, that I will second to others:  Don't pull this assembly on a brass fount unless you have to!  I have already applied this to the other 220C I have (Project #3, dated A '47) but that tank was immaculate after some BBs, vinegar, and denatured alcohol. 
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ecblanks
Careful getting a fa tube too hot. They solder they used on the joints doesn't take much heat at all before it starts to run. 
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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smithers646
Roger that, good point. Chemical and mechanical cleaning.
Here, btw, is the slightly younger brother of the subject lantern (A '47 220C) that kept me company on the patio during dinner and a Braves game tonight:
20190715_224031sm.jpg 
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smithers646
Thanks Mike= is this up on the sale board on OCP? or somewhere else? I can't see the pics anymore, but remember this from last night as a May 45 220 D,correct= and price is $40? One more question- is the fount reasonably clean on the inside, pr do you know if the FA tube needs to be cleaned?
(two questions, I guess.) I need it to be functional, but dont want to tear another bung off the fount trying to get it there.
Thanks much for the offer
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