200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Quick Cal
I thought I'd ask this time so not to mess things up on this nice little 200A.

1.  I can not get the fuel cap off. At first it would not budge. But it finally broke free by hand. It will unscrew almost all the way off, but then it stops at the top of the threads. It has the screw in top of the cap. Should I take that out. How should I proceed.

2. The cleaner rod will not turn. I don't want to force it. The main valve turns but seems sticky. I don't want to just start taking things apart with out asking first. So what should I do.

3. Since it seems to be gummed up will the check valve and main valve need to come out for cleaning.

Thant's enough for now. Thanks.

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Gand28
Tighten the cap and remove the screw, then remove the painted cap. The insert is likely stuck to the fill. You can pry it off. 

Read the tutorial on single mantle restoration before you do anything else.

http://www.oldcolemanparts.com/resources/re_1lant.php
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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TwoCanoes
The OCP tutorial is great with the exception of the suggestion on how to remove the check valve by using a large screwdriver.  If the check valve needs to come out, the tool from OCP is the way to go (see link below).  If $37 plus shipping is too much, let me know and I'll loan you my tool.  I'll pay for the shipping to you if you'll pay for the return shipping. 

https://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=2179&cat=&page=1
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Quick Cal
TwoCanoes wrote:
The OCP tutorial is great with the exception of the suggestion on how to remove the check valve by using a large screwdriver.  If the check valve needs to come out, the tool from OCP is the way to go (see link below).  If $37 plus shipping is too much, let me know and I'll loan you my tool.  I'll pay for the shipping to you if you'll pay for the return shipping. 

https://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=2179&cat=&page=1


Thanks for the kind offer. But I think I have something that will work.

I saw a video where a guy used a spade bit with the point ground off. I just happen to have one I made years ago like that. But it's 3/4''. and it's just a tad over 1/16' thick.  Not sure if that's thick enough. He said it needed to be 1/2'' wide. How wide and thick is the blade on your tool.

I'm heading out for awhile. Will check back in later. Thanks

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surffisher60
btw.... that lantern is in great shape compared to most found from that era.
bob
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TwoCanoes
Here's the OCP tool on top and my homemade tool on the bottom.  The blade on the OCP tool is 1/2 x 3/32.  The blade on mine is 7/16 x 1/8.  It has a 3/8 hex shaft.  The tubing on the shaft of my tool keeps it centered in the fount's pump tube while you're torquing on the shaft.  The tubing is 3/4 o.d. with a 3/16 wall thickness, and as you can see in the picture, it is slit vertically to slip it over the shaft.  The blade on the tool really needs to be no more than a half inch  because the check valve is slightly recessed in the bottom of the pump tube, so the rim around the edge of the check valve will get buggered up with a wider blade.
CV new picture.jpg 
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zoomkat
"The cleaner rod will not turn. I don't want to force it."

Beware that some people damage lanterns by trying to "fix" things that are really not an issue. As to the cleaning rod, you might try loosening the packing nut and heating the packing area with a small butane torch. When the packing area is hot, try turning the rod some to loosen it up.
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TwoCanoes
zoomkat's right.  Regarding the check valve, I'd say don't take it out unless it needs to come out.  I have seen several recommendations on this forum on how to free up a stuck ball without removing the check valve.  Even with the wonderful OCP tool, it is possible to damage a check valve (don't ask how I know).
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REJ2
The advantage of the check valve tool is that is designed to lock into the check valve via the threaded rod.
Bob    
Never, ever, leave behind a $5 lamp
MilSpecOps Syndicate #016
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0131
Coleman Blues 243 #86
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #047
Coleman Quick-Lite Crew #23
ICCC #1574
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JimL
Without the check valve tool, you're asking for trouble by assuming it needs to be removed.  I've only ever run across one or two that would not return to normal function with an application or two of carb cleaner, and those check valve were damaged.   Remove the pump, spray some carb cleaner in the tube and let it sit for a bit.  If you get carb cleaner on the paint, wipe it immediately as it will remove paint.  Then insert just the pump and slowly/gently pump downwards to force the carb cleaner through the check valve.  You can then do this again.  Go as slowly as you can.  If you go quickly, you will force the carb cleaner out of the 'snorkel' and into the fount where it will do nothing for you.  If you can get that area saturated and let it sit several hours or overnight, you may be all set.  You can also speed it up by using a bamboo skewer with a point or a fine wire.  If using a wire, be gentle so you don't scratch the ball in the check valve.  Don't worry about carb cleaner in the fount.  It'll mix with the fuel and burn.

For the tip cleaner, you can loosen the nut just a hare and see if it frees up.   If that doesn't work, you could apply a little heat, but to do that, ensure the tip cleaner nut is back in place and that the fuel cap is on.  You don't want to ignite any fumes.  Do NOT try to remove the tip cleaner assembly on a 200A. 

On the chance that the cleaning rod is jammed in the generator, you can remove the generator.  Actually, you'll want to remove and inspect the geerator  anyway.

-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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Gand28
I wouldn’t mess with the tip cleaner until you have at least removed the generator. Sometimes a jammed pricker rod will restrict movement of the e-block. 

If you plan to take it all apart, removing the valve and soaking in citric acid then spraying through it with Carb cleaner will clean deposits that may be restricting movement of the cleaning lever. Get the whole assembly clean and then you can apply heat to gently loosen the cleaning lever if still stuck. As others have said, don’t use brute force. 
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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242burner
+1 JimL!!!

I have only seen one check valve fail and it was on a 200a that had the same types of problems you are having with this one.  Probably had fuel left in for decades.  Do not try to push air into this lantern until you have removed and oiled the pump leather, making sure in is not fragmenting.  There will be two things for sure you need to replace, the fuel cap gasket and the generator. So when I buy a lanterns, I take the price of the fuel, gen, gasket and subtract that from the asking price, with no compunction.  Your first rebuild should be a 200a.  Check out Lantern Lab on you tube.
1928 L-220 "Slant" from Russ
1919 Air-O from Jerry
500 Speedmaster

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JimL
Good advice on the Lanternlabs video!  Here's it is:


-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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zoomkat
Be advised that if you remove the generator to clean it, the older generators often have a piece of wire mesh inside that does not fall out with the other components. You just gently push it out with a bamboo skewer or straight paperclip and then assemble it with the other generator internals before placing them back in the generator.
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JimL
If the generator has that little screen, remove it and toss it.  It may have been needed in the old days with unfiltered fuel which had a lot of trash in it, but serves no useful purpose now.  I had forgotten about this little screen and sure enough, I bent the pricker wire on a new to me lantern last week.

-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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zoomkat
 "It may have been needed in the old days with unfiltered fuel which had a lot of trash in it, but serves no useful purpose now."

Just my two cents, but I don't think the screen had anything to do with trash in the fuel being bought. External trash most likely enters into the lantern tank thru refueling operations (look at what is in the bottom of your lawnmower fuel tank). I would think that the screen was installed to capturer large particles of  carbon and other products that build up in the generator over time and break lose due to the heating/cooling cycles. The Amish that use gas lanterns in their daily lives might be a good source of info as to the value of screens in the generators.
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JimL
I believe it was in the 80's that Coleman stopped adding screens to the generators.  Coleman also at one time produced a list of 'Aproved Gasolines' for each state.  I have a pdf copy, but don't know when it was produced or if it was in relation to this.  Unfortunately, I can't zoom it clearly.

-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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