200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

elchund
Hi,
I have a 200A with red debris in the fuel, the red sealer in the fount is coming of. I have tried the swirling nuts/bolts in the fuel method and after the last rinse the fuel coming out of the fount is reasonably clear. But, when I shine a light inside the fount a lot of it is still there along with some rust.

I want to use a tank sealer, not POR 15 but a similar product, and reseal the tank, but is it a good idea? Will I succeed in sealing in the old sealer as well, or could I be asking for even more trouble down the road with patches of the old sealer still in the fount?

I have already filled and rinsed the fount with a rust remover (phosphoric acid) and put it somwhere warm to dry. I will blow it out with compressed air before I proceed with the sealer.

Any comments or shared experiences are very welcome.

Elchund
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Asbestos
I would rinse the tank with some soapy water and then a few clean rinses to make sure you have all the acid out. If you leave any in it will be trapped and could cause an issue. Other than that I think you should be fine as long as all the red that is left in the tank is solid
Pithy saying wanted- will pay cash for wit.

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Gand28
Greetings to you in Norway.  Once you have the tank liner peeling, you should try and get it all out.  I have found Acetone or something like MEK will dissolve it.

If you want to seal the tank, many of us are using Caswell's tank sealer with good results.  It tends to bond to itself more than the surface to it would cover any old liner remaining, but I would worry about the liner that is on the upper part of the fount.  If that is not sealed too, then you could have it falling into the fuel.  If you can get all that out first, it may be best.

Good luck and welcome to the forum.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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mcdugal2
As far as I knew 200As never had a coating from the factory so it must be from a PO... Or it could be fuel residue...
Phil Rhoades ICCC# 1125
The Coleman Blue's 243's. #035

"I'm a man, but I can Change, if I have to, I guess." - Red Green
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Gand28
mcdugal2 wrote:
As far as I knew 200As never had a coating from the factory so it must be from a PO... Or it could be fuel residue...


Starting in the early 70's you find a pinkish liner in all 200A founts.  Became darker brown in the later 70's and 80's.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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elchund
Thanks everyone! I never thought of using acetone, I will try that and let it soak for an hour or so before I rinse. I should probably do another round with acid after that.

Its definitely factory applied sealer in there, mine is a '74. Its got the same fount sealer as my 220K. As for Coleman fuel for rust prevention, I don't really know. I bought a well used 425F stove and the tank smelled of Coleman fuel when I got it. It blew a hole in the tank after a few years, in the "bulge" underneath at the valve end. There was a coin size rust spot there, the rest of the tank was rust free and shiny (no apparent liner). I think there had been water in the fuel, and with the stove sitting on a shelf for a while the water gravitated to the bottom of the tank and it started to rust, rust never sleeps I guess...  I actually welded it up, and it has been working great for more than a year. I am going to seal this tank too.

Elchund

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Gasman64
[sSig_welcome4] from Pennsylvania, USA! Good luck with your 200A.
Steve
ICCC #1012




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Gunhippie
Rust inhibitor is not the same thing as rust proofing. When you pump a GPA up, you're introducing air and water vapor into the fount, and the water will condense and settle to the bottom of the fount where it will do its evil thing.

If you're going to use a tank sealer, get the inside of the fount as clean as possible. You'll get a better bond with the sealer, and not have "live" rust underneath the sealer, which definitely will cause problems down the line.

A little phosphoric acid residue in the fount isn't a problem. It forms iron phosphate, which is a pretty good rust preventative. I often use phos acid as a pre-paint prep for mild steel, and just let it air-dry before shooting the primer coat. I learned this trick from an old-school panel-beater.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Dmacp
Quote:
As far as I knew 200As never had a coating from the factory


in the early sixties they used a silver sealer. I've seen the brownish red, not sure what year.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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