Sportsman globe
Blow out price
Was $19
Now $8
JeepJeepster

Took an unfortunate risk and bid on a lantern on ebay. In short, 44 US agm with 5 stress cracks. Should I say something to the seller or caulk it up as an ignorant mistake? When I bid on it I thought it was a coleman. 


If I keep it, I guess Ill try redkote since I already have it and have had success with it stopping rust on a 220E. 



Quote
Gand28
You didn’t buy a lantern, you bought an education. We’ve all done it. Ask the seller nicely if they saw the cracks. Perhaps you can arrange some partial refund. 
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
Quote
rob_pontius
I would try Greg's approach as well. Maybe the seller didn't know about the cracks either. I've done it also.
Quote
Majicwrench
A lot depends on description in ad. Was it billed as functional? Or parts? Or...
Keith
Quote
warren
Do not try to repair this lantern.   You'll just be asking for trouble.

Was it a seller that sells lots of lanterns or just this one?

ANTIQUESWV on Ebay
#1 in the 223B club
Gatlinburg, TN

Quote
JeepJeepster
They offered to take it back if I wanted to ship it or give me $12.50, which was basically the shipping. Kept it as I figure they just didnt know it was cracked. So Im in it for $32. 

May just offer it up for parts... Didnt come with a globe. 

From looking at their page they seem to sale random things. No other lanterns listed. 

Description simply said ‘as is’ so they couldve told me tough luck. 
Quote
JimL
As previously stated, don't repair it.   AGM's are known for stress cracks and there's nothing to prevent more down the road.  Besides, only Caswells had confidence that their product would be fine with the pressure of a GPA.  The fuel tank in your car, boat, motorcycle, etc. are not pressure vessels.

-Jim

If your hands and under arms are bleeding, your beer bottle might not have a twist off cap.

Quote
macwacs
Welcome to the club. Been there done that. Just about everything AGM is cracked. Lesson learned good for parts or display and can be used as a training tool for others.
 RMW
Quote
mgmlvks
Education, take the adjustment, seek a replacement, and/or use a 220 fount to put back in service
Mike, ICCC member #1156, Slant Saver Group #011, 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0215
"In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present"
Francis Bacon
(and - for those who have asked - avatar from postcard and says "Coming Home by Rail".  https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4595/27430282209_39a564be00_z.jpg
 
 
Quote
Eel
It would make a nice Frankie with a 220C fount applied... or a AGM 3927 steel fount (no parts recess)

EEL Eclectic Lanterns, div.  Doofenshmirtz-EEL Incorporated.

Quote
austin65uri
"As is", and "as is " was bad.  I think more than a few of us who buy on-line have experienced the same.  You are correct in how you are handling the issue.  
Bill.
ICCC#1601
Quote
Aspbear
I would just use a good fount and Mark what it used to be, important thing is don't ty to fix the fount.

sometimes those are hard to see until pressure tested. I have bought them at yard sales and auctions only to find once you get the dirt off that they leak.
G.B. Harp
Quote
BSAGuy
If you are in that for $32, that's not so bad.  Sounds like the seller made a fair adjustment for you.  He was probably not aware of what to look for in the fount.  I'd either seek a replacement fount, or if you don't want to put any more money into it, you could probably part it out and break even or even make a small profit. 
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
Quote
Chucker
I like mine to run so like others I'd find a replacement fount. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
scl
put both hands on face, cry a little and then look for replacement fount, coleman will do.
Quote
fuel brained
The only safe thing to do is to replace the fount. Stress cracks will only grow. Been there did that. Call it a learning experience and remember it. Brass founts are like concrete. Its not if they crack but when.
Pastor Jeff
God said "Let there be light" so He let His Son shine.
SoCal and Lovin' It
US Navy Submarine Cold War Veteran
MilSpec Ops #1960 "Feel the Roar"
Quote
JeepJeepster
Ill be on the look out for a coleman fount but I've got to image its tough to find a 44 US coleman fount. 

Sure would hate to lose the parts bin. It had the pricker in it and a new leather wrapped up in the what I'm assuming is the original paper. 

Its all good though, it came with a pack of silk-lites so that makes it all better. 
Quote
dbosch
We've all been there.  Fill up a new lantern, pump it up and then see the wet ring of shame on the pavement.  Whether it be cracks or a corroded bottom.
Dan B.  ICCC #100
The Texas Dust Bowl

Faith is not about everything turning out okay; faith is about being okay no matter how things turn out.
Quote
Nuiman
If you remove the fount be careful not to rip the bung out like was done to this 1944 AGM.
[P1010460]  
Quote
brucesheehe
Be happy to have a nice shelf queen in your collection = a piece of history.

I have that very lantern, and it is cracked too.

Take a sharpie marker and write on the bottom = DO NOT USE - STRESS CRACKED - FIRE HAZZARD.  Also, take the sealing gasket out of the fuel cap - just in case.

Coleman told everyone to drill a hole in the bottom of the 501 stove - so it could not be used.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
Quote
Dmacp
If you'd ever had a reseal job go on you, it all suddenly makes sense. If it's gasoline you will have a flame thrower. In your kitchen. On the draperies. Or at the light up, on your wife's evening gown. Even if it's not gasoline, and the lantern is good and hot. Having a fire extinguisher is not enough. you need to have it in your hand with the pin pulled.
I've had it happen with POR15 and got the fount good and hot. A year after I sealed it. Just never got it hot enough.
A guy on True North had a caswell job go on him. Caswell's is epoxy and epoxy is thermoset by cross-linking, but to itself only, not to the fount.
We had a guy here burn his shed to the ground. And Ben might relate how he spent a few days in the burn ward to keep us all on our toes.
Play safe!
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
JimL
Thanks for posting that Dan.  Too many folks think any fount liner will do the job and is perfectly safe.  Some that do want to risk it shouldn't be suggesting to others to do it just because they've had luck with it.   But then again, I'm also not a fan of recommending caustic acids to newbies.  Not everyone knows how to handle acids/alkali's and could get seriously hurt if not handled properly. 

There was a member here a few years ago that was documenting tank liner failures (can't recall the username).  He had a pic of a Caswell'd fount that the Caswells didn't exactly fail, but a bubble started appearing through a crack that opened up in the fount.  Unfortunately, that member disappeared.  Not driven off, but was one who had a reputation of posting hot and heavy and then disappearing for months.  I always hoped he'd come back and finish that research but it's been a few years now so my expectations are low.

-Jim

If your hands and under arms are bleeding, your beer bottle might not have a twist off cap.

Quote
Dmacp
If it's the guy I'm thinking of he will be back. Every so often he sticks his head in and says hi.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Nuiman
My 1945 AGM fount has stress fractures, with pics.  
[P6060083][P6060075][P6060076]I have no plans, just pointing it out for safety.  Jim
Quote
offrink
I just had an Akron pop a couple of cracks. The bung was soldered poorly and I fixed it. I pumped it up to pressure test my job and heard “ping.....ping”. I didn’t think about it at first (it sounded like shifting metal on your exhaust) and when I submerged in soapy water bubbles poured out of the cracks but none from my repair. so Akron’s can have stress cracks too!
Ben
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0035
Looking for B-Day dates of 6/80, 2/84, 3/11, and 12/13
Quote
Dmacp
these crack but they don't all crack. Just most of them. They can be gotten cheap on ebay, any AGM is a gamble but I've been able to replace most of my bad founts with uncracked ones.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
MYN
Founts with stress cracks are very difficult to mend. They are basically compromised pressure vessels. Repairs are not recommended,if not prohibited, whatever the brand.
But once every often, I do look for trouble and would risk just about anything to get one working again. I'll coat the entire fount's surface (inside and outside) with solder before giving it a Caswell-like epoxy treatment. Don't expect it to look very good after that. So long as it works.
I was hoping that the overall uniform heating of the fount during solder-coating could at least relieve some of the stresses within the fount.
Quote
Aspbear
Please just don't do the coating thing.  If you would like I will send you pictures of the grafts on my right leg.  It has been 3 years and I don't wear shorts anymore not because of the way it looks but because if the sun hits those graft area's it hurts.

just simply no
G.B. Harp
Quote
Dmacp
Quote:
Please just don't do the coating thing

Did you have a coating job go bad on you? I wish you'd share your experience with us. Might sober us up a little.

Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
MYN
The advise is clear. Do not attempt to repair any founts with stress cracks with the intention to make it functional again. 
That's especially for those that run on CF or gasoline.
No amount of mending would render them safe again from any point of view.
At best, make them just as shelf queens, not workhorses.
Quote
Gand28
I would disagree. I have repaired and coated several unique founts with multiple cracks. They are restored and I have run them on special occasions. I always treat them a bit skeptically however and am on the lookout for failure.   I have also coated some minor cracks caused by stamping...CPR and a 249 where the embossing made a weak/thin spot. 

As for an AGM mil-spec, they have cracking and bung issues. I might look for a good one rather than attempt repair as I’m not sure the ultimate value justifies the work involved. 
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
Quote
zoomkat
Any tank repair needs to be pressure tested at a minimum. Get a Schrader valve fuel cap, a tire/bicycle pump with a pressure gauge, fill the tank full of water, and pressure test higher than normal operating pressure. Pressure cycle a couple of times to look for other cracks/leaks and to see if the repaired cracks start to propagate. 
Quote
5fivesix
Stress cracking and brass I dont think I'd mess with it.Steel or stainless I d weld all day on that's just what I do for a living.I suppose it would boil down to what you want. Do your research on what it would take and decide whether it's worth it or not.I also think pouring an epoxy in the tank alone wouldn't fix it either however using both would probably be better.Just know the risks and decide and be safe 
Quote
Colemannut
I agree with Gand28. I have used Caswells on some very hard to find founts that had very fine stress cracks. I don't use them daily but when I do, they burn for hours at a time. The Caswell sealer is only as good as the one using it and if done correctly, there should not be any issues with it leaking again. I don't use any other sealers so I will not say they are good or bad. Anything dealing with fuel and fire has its risks. If you aren't sure about something, don't do it. Not everyone is mechanically handy, So use you own judgment.

As for this AGM fount, use it as a shelf queen or throw it away. There are many out there that are good that can replace it.
Quote
macwacs
Anyone ever notice that the stress cracks are almost always on the side of the tank. A good machinist could make a die and make the tank .Once the die is made to cost per tank goes down as they are made.
RMW
Quote
5fivesix
They probably didnt aneal it before running it through the die.Or the die maker didnt take off the burrs.Ive seen almost new looking  agm stuff have stress cracks kind of makes you wonder how much of that crap got issued to people and failed.Agm seems to be the made in china of it's time 
Quote
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.