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Scrubjay
Howdy y'all!  What kind of thread sealers do y'all use?  I'm working on an Akron 134G and when I get the valve assembly tight enough, it's sitting way too low and not in the right position.  Should I use Loctite, pipe-dope, or... Please advise!  When I took it apart the first time it did have some kind of dope/sealer on it.

Thank you in advance,

Jaybird
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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rob_pontius
I use gasoila hard set varnish sealer. It's the same thing that Coleman has used for many years. It works great. You don't have to tighten the valve real tight for it to seal.
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Smudge
I use Loctite 545. I'm no expert, but it's worked well for me so far.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003XZB54O/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
"If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts,
also happens to the man. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” - Chief Seattle

ICCC # 1726  -  Bernz0matiC Appreciation Club #057
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Eel
Hi Jay - Had fun with y'all this weekend, thanks for making the trip. 
I use Rectorseal #5 pipe dope.
There is a fairly recent video of a Coleman plant tour that shows a ginormous bottle of Loctite #262 atop an assy bench. 
Coleman seems to have used "Gasoila" for many years.  Still available
Some here use Permatex FAG #1 or more often #2.  I have used FAG Aero #3 with success on lanterns and also on Datsuns.

Some people come home from a GPA gathering with less stuff than they left home with.  Apparently I am not one of those people...

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Scrubjay
Thanks fellahs: now where does one get said items: are they readily available like Ace, Home-despot, auto-parts stores?  Yes, I'm sure I can get the Loctite at the auto-store.

Eel-Dave, yeah, that was swell wasn't it?  How long did it take you to get home?  We stopped in Calistoga for the night: we both felt like deep-fried zombies when we got there--Ghhhaaagh!

JB
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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pagrey
I use Permatex high temperature thread sealant, it never hardens. It is available everywhere. I'd use the original Colaman stuff Rob uses  but I make too many mistakes and end up pulling the valve 10 times on my lanterns.
Paul
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Eel
Hi Jay - 11.5 hours, I just love carving through the Bay.  For the first time in memory, there wasn't a jam at the south end of Gilroy.  It was a really good day to be headed south as opposed to north.
The Rectorseal #5 used to be easy at OSH - I suspect HD or Ace or any plumbing shop has it. 
My local Kragens carries many of the Permatex FAG products.  I can also get Loctite 262 there, at HD or at Walmart.

Next time, stay in Boonville... AVBC will slake your thirst and feed you well.

Some people come home from a GPA gathering with less stuff than they left home with.  Apparently I am not one of those people...

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Scrubjay
Holy mother of pearl, that's a long drive!  Again thanks fer the info boys: I'll head over to Kragen Auto, or whatever they call it this week--YIPPEEE!

JB
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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Chucker
I use any medium strength blue Loctite/thread sealer if we're talking about valve to fount applications. No failures to date. 
Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Mike DeHart
Permatex Form-A-Gasket products, listed as FAG above, are at the auto parts stores.  They come in small tubes, or large tubes if you plan to use a LOT of it.  Permatex #1 dries hard, #2 stays a little bit pliable and is easier to take apart later.  I generally use #2 since I have it on hand for old car repairs.
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Deanofid
pagrey wrote:
I use Permatex high temperature thread sealant, it never hardens. It is available everywhere. I'd use the original Colaman stuff Rob uses  but I make too many mistakes and end up pulling the valve 10 times on my lanterns.

This stuff that Paul mentions is my favorite of everything I've tried.  Really The Stuff in my book.  I get mine at NAPA.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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Dmacp
I use Locktite #515-the stuff that looks like grape jelly. (doesn't taste the same though)
Permatex also makes it, forget the number but it's in a blue tube. It's anaerobic gel gasket, you can feel it tighten up as you assemble it.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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zoomkat
I definitely would use a "sealant" rather than a "locker" unless locking the parts takes priority. I would think a sealant that maintains some amount of liquidity would be best such that the cracks and crannies that may develop thru thermal movement will continue to be sealed. Someone recently mentioned a sealant that contains particulate Teflon that sounds interesting. If the component is threading in too far, then Teflon tape might be an answer to somewhat bush up the threads a bit.
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Eel
zoomkat wrote:
I definitely would use a "sealant" rather than a "locker" unless locking the parts takes priority.

That is how I have always felt: that said, threadlockers also have sealant properties, and thread sealants also have locking properties.
zoomkat wrote:
I would think a sealant that maintains some amount of liquidity would be best such that the cracks and crannies that may develop thru thermal movement will continue to be sealed. Someone recently mentioned a sealant that contains particulate Teflon that sounds interesting.
 
Yes, flexibility matters and that's exactly I don't use 222/242/243 here.  The Rectorseal #5 is a PTFE-bearing compound that's gas-rated and doesn't cure.  The PTFE is what I like least about it!  Rectorseal also makes a blue gas pipe dope that seals well and doesn't cure.
zoomkat wrote:
If the component is threading in too far, then Teflon tape might be an answer to somewhat bush up the threads a bit.

Or tin the threads instead.

Some people come home from a GPA gathering with less stuff than they left home with.  Apparently I am not one of those people...

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Rhubarb
I use and recommend brand name Loctite 242. (243 is the same)  It's fuel resistant and sets up, but not hard enough to be tough to disassemble later.  Just last week I had to disassemble a Kamplite Inverted Lantern to clean out a fuel orifice.  I had used Loctite 242 on the valve assy three years prior, no problem for me to take it apart now.
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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Eel
243 is resistant to higher temp than 242 or 222 - a good reason to NOT pick it in most lantern/stove apps.  You'd like to be able to heat it "just a bit" for disassembly.

Some people come home from a GPA gathering with less stuff than they left home with.  Apparently I am not one of those people...

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Rhubarb
I attended a seminar on Loctite at the SAVMI Conference in 2016, the informed person (maybe just a sales person) there gave me the impression that 234 was just a newer formulation of 242, the main difference being the viscosity.  The TDS are nearly identical, hot strength is slightly higher on the 243.
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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Lanterndude
rob_pontius wrote:
I use gasoila hard set varnish sealer. It's the same thing that Coleman has used for many years. It works great. You don't have to tighten the valve real tight for it to seal.


+1 on the GASOILA if you can get some and yes very true, Coleman did use it for years and it's best to use (if possible).

It's what I use (but have also used Loctite before as others have mentioned).

Gasoila Red Hard Set thread sealant.jpg  Gasoila Blue soft set thread sealant.jpg  Gasoila Red Thread Sealant.jpg  th (1).jpg  th.jpg

This stuff is also very good that is if you can find it....

155.jpg 

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

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zeke79
Gasoila hardset or Indianhead gasket shellac. 
Looking for Handy Gas Plants!
ICCC #1550
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Scrubjay
Well, I ended up getting Permatex "Ultra Copper", it's for exhaust manifolds--yeah boy!  It needs to cure over night and I'll test it tomorrow: more later...

JB
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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Rhubarb
From what I  can gather, Permatex "Ultra Copper" is  a high temp RTV (room temperature vulcanizing) silicone. It is not necessarily a thread sealer (and far from a thread locker) and may leave your valve assembly a little loosey goosey in your fount. 

Maybe I was mistaken and you are looking to seal up the burner section of your lantern?

Who knows, it might just be the ticket! I look forward to hearing the results of your experience. 
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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Chucker
I"ve not heard of anyone using RTV for a valve to fount situation before. Guess it does have "improved oil resistance".
Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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salukispeed
RTV is generally not considered fuel proof, Even the High temp . You might carefully research this and possibly reconsider. We used it on a motorcycle fuel system fittings a few years ago and over time the material swelled and became jelly like and worked its way thru the entire system. Nothing really dissolves it but it looses its ability to stay put. and is difficult to get out once it disperses 
Bob
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zoomkat
Back in the day, farmer brown probably used something like a mix of fine sawdust and axle grease.  
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Scrubjay
GRRRRR!, wouldn't ya effen know it; they all said RTV EXCEPT this stuff, but it is, snatta-fratta-frinkin'--GRRRR!  The place near me doesn't keep their shelves stocked very well, what a pain in butox...

JB
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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salukispeed
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Back in the day, farmer brown probably used something like a mix of fine sawdust and axle grease. 

All of my Italian Heat treating equipment has Common pipe dope mixed horses tail hair.  Looks weird ( sticky-Hairy ) They use it like Teflon tape but seals even Stainless steel British pipe thread.. Only thing I found to compare is Loctite 565 pipe sealant and a gentle warming before returning to service to asist it to cure
Bob
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Scrubjay
Bob, I use cat hair to reinforce plaster when I need to do a repair on my house from 1926!

OK, I freakin' hate that you can't find anything at a real store anymore, but I did find this stuff:

[52000WS]

http://www.itwconsumer.com/versachem-products/product.cfm?id=Gasket%20Shellac-129

JB
Judge a person by their actions, not their beliefs; for very few people practice what they preach!
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Rhubarb
I've read that Pat-a-Lac S-5291 was the preferred thread sealer at the Coleman factory.
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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JeepJeepster
I've been using permatex aviation sealant on anything that involves fuel/lanterns. 

It will not setup so youve got to tighten whatever youre working with. If it doesn't line up theres nothing you can do. 
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Dmacp
IMG_0304.jpg 
Dan
ICCC member #604
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