Sportsman globe
Blow out price
Was $19
Now $8
LongueCarabine
Hi everyone.  A couple weeks back I posted pics of the 427 and 327 that I got for $5 apiece at our local flea market / antique mall.

Been doing some cleaning and the 427 is coming along nicely.

However, I am not sure what is going on with this 327 vent.  I put it in a mixture of water and vinegar (maybe half and half) for a couple hours one night, and when I took it out, it had all this stuff on it.  

At first I thought I had taken all the nickel off but tonight I started rubbing some spots with Mothers and now I am not so sure.  I think it is just unbelievably filthy with this crusty stuff on it.  Underneath it seems that the nickel is fine.  You can see where the "WICHITA" looks like it is starting to shine.  So far I have not seen any nickel flaking off.

Just wondering what you fellows think, let me know.

327 Vent.jpg 

Brian
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Gand28
Looks like the brass is showing through the nickel. A couple hours in 50/50 vinegar/water will dissolve nickel plating!
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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LongueCarabine
I sure hope you're wrong, gonna try cleaning some more off.  The thing is, I cleaned the 427 vent in that solution for much longer and it hasn't lost any nickel!

Brian
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JimL
>>The thing is, I cleaned the 427 vent in that solution for much longer and it hasn't lost any nickel!
 
I can't understand why.  Perhaps it wasn't heated and that's what saved you.  Regardless, glad it isn't all gone!

Ever since I saw how fast nickel gets removed with acid (citric or vinegar), I don't think I've left them in solution more than a few minutes, tops.  Even then I'm nervous.

-Jim

Author of the children’s books:

 - Santa Claus And Other Lies Your Parents Told You
 - Pop! Goes Froggy, And Other Great Microwave Games
 - Operation and Nomenclature of the Colt 1911-A1 .45 ACP

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LongueCarabine
Oh well, it just might be you guys are right.  I don't know if I should keep it as is or eventually have it re-done.  It's not like the vent was in pristine condition to start with.

Brian
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offrink
Brian, we have all made that mistake before. It’s pinkish due to the zinc coming out of the brass. It will still polish up nice but the marks won’t go away. I would keep it and use it! A pristine one will come around someday!
Ben
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0035
Looking for B-Day dates of 6/80, 2/84, 3/11, and 12/13
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Chucker
I set a timer now for every 8 minutes when I soak stuff in citric. 

Like Ben says, it should polish up just fine. 
Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Mike
The 327 vents have really thin plating and the brass corrosion in pitted areas gives it that pinkish crusty look as the acid leaches out the zinc.
I usually mix a strongish batch of citric acid, but don't soak the vent. I bathe the citric on with 0000 steel wool and without pressure clean the oxidation and other grunge off the vent. Very controllable and you can work the dirtiest areas more than the cleaner areas to keep as much nickel as possible.

Before the howls of protest over steel wool on nickel--the key is keep it wet and next to no finger pressure on the wool. Let the acid do the work. The wool just keeps swiping off the oxidation so that the acid can hit the next "layer" of it. If an area looks like the nickel is getting thin, I dunk it in water, and keep acid away from that spot as I clean the rest.

Dunkin' is for donuts!

Good luck!

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Chucker
^^^ Mike you're not alone. That has been pretty much my approach to nickel for the past 5-6 years. I found my oven cleaner was not 'cutting it' like citric does. One does have to be diligent about watching the exposure of the nickel to citric acid. 
Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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dwillie
Once you fire it, the brass areas will turn darker, and hardly show. I have had some vents that didn't have any plating left. This one turned a nice gray color afterDSCN3547.jpg DSCN3548.jpg 
Darien.
“All of us are creatures of a day; the rememberer and the remembered alike.”    

Coleman Blues #67.   ICCC #1242.   Searching for 5-1940. 6-36.
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mikew
Chucker wrote:
^^^ Mike you're not alone. That has been pretty much my approach to nickel for the past 5-6 years. I found my oven cleaner was not 'cutting it' like citric does. One does have to be diligent about watching the exposure of the nickel to citric acid. 


Same here, but I use 0000 steel wool dipped in Mothers with light pressure.  
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05; Milspec Ops 0045
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LongueCarabine
I've been looking around and have found some other collectors who do their own nickel plating.  Wondering if anyone here has tried it and what the results were?

Is it even worth re-plating the lantern if it's going to be a user?

TIA

Brian
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KaiserKrebs
Well this sucks, I blamed a lack of Nickel plating on my Air O Lantern QL due to a previous owners over polishing efforts. Turns out it may have been my own fault due to a cleaning vinegar soak.  Thing is that it was so tarnished when I got I it I couldn’t even tell if there was nickel on it. 

I should kick myself in the shorts for this, isn’t someone doing miracles on Nickel founts with toilet bowl cleaner?
It burns like a Howitzer
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Gunhippie
I use phosphoric acid for cleaning, as I have access to it. I've never had a problem with it removing nickel unless the nickel was already undercut by corrosion. I am very careful how long I leave anything in an acid bath, 'though. I use an ultrasonic cleaner and it really speeds things up, so usually 30 sec. or less does the trick. I remove any parts from the acid bath as soon as I see the least "pinking" of exposed brass.

Mike: Your oven cleaner or lye do totally different things than acids. Caustic cleaners like lye and oven cleaner remove organic compounds, while acids remove corrosion (and metal if overdone). I usually use both, the caustic first, as weak acids don't cut through organics (grease, soot, etc). The caustic cleaner will remove the organic crud and let the acids do their thing.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Mike
Gunhippie wrote:

Mike: Your oven cleaner or lye do totally different things than acids. Caustic cleaners like lye and oven cleaner remove organic compounds, while acids remove corrosion (and metal if overdone). I usually use both, the caustic first, as weak acids don't cut through organics (grease, soot, etc). The caustic cleaner will remove the organic crud and let the acids do their thing.


Huh? Never used lye or oven cleaner on a vent, but I've made soap with it.

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Gunhippie
Sorry, Mike, but I thought I was replying to another Mike. The post seems to be gone.

As for user nickel-over-brass vents, face it: If you use it, it will turn brown. Find a nice vent and keep it that way for show, and have a user vent that you don't much care if it it turns color. I've wasted far too much time getting a nickel-plated vent looking perfect, then fired it up and seen what happens.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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LongueCarabine
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As for user nickel-over-brass vents, face it: If you use it, it will turn brown. Find a nice vent and keep it that way for show, and have a user vent that you don't much care if it it turns color. I've wasted far too much time getting a nickel-plated vent looking perfect, then fired it up and seen what happens.


That sounds like a good idea!

Brian
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rob_pontius
Oven cleaner is definitely the way to go here. The organics on the fount and vent can be cleaned off with a toothbrush after a soak. I usually let it sit for between 30-60 minutes. It does absolutely no harm to the nickel.
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Dmacp
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use phosphoric acid for cleaning, as I have access to it. I've never had a problem with it removing nickel unless the nickel was already undercut by corrosion

+1    Under the black carbon, the nickel is already gone. Very similar to removing the carbon (and corrosion) from around a match hole. I don't use citric, and don't understand the fascination with it.  but I have never had good nickel come off with vinegar or any other weak acid.  I don't use white (distilled) vinegar though, and I dilute it with warm water. And limit the exposure to a few minutes. Pretty much the same with ammonia. Strong ammonia can damage nickel, so dilute it. I prefer phosphoric acid and I think it is safest. But I do limit the exposure time. The flash nickel is very thin. #0000 steel wool is the same steel as coarse steel wool. The scratches are just finer.Try putting a pad of it on a D/A and polishing the paint on your car, you will see what I mean. Use it before the plating goes on, but not after. It is a mechanical abrasive, not a polish. Use it to reduce the surface roughness like you would #3000 wet & dry. follow with finer and finer abrasive, all the way down to toothpaste if you want a really good finish. Then plate it.  New nickel is like a mirror. Sometimes it's hard to see scratches in a dimly lighted room. Take it out in the sun and you will see them. Of course, if the plating is already a dull gray, well, you've got nothing to lose. Even the softest polish can burn through thin flash nickel if you use a buffing wheel. I do it by hand, very gently. When having something plated a layer of copper should be between the nickel and the base metal-even if it is brass. It's prettier, and much more resistant to the elements.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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