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olah123
Hi everyone, 
 Please can anyone help me ?
  I have been given a 275 to put back together but as I not familiar with them I am finding it difficult.... as I do not own one and I did not take it apart...
 I have taken a few pics of the valve assembly, I know it needs a new 'valve packing' I presume it goes between the two brass 'collars' ( one is shaped like a cup and the other one is just like a normal washer) which 'collar' goes on first and which way round does it go ???
 And on the valve 'pin' should the small needle come through the rear of the eccentric block ??? as it is sticking through about the same length as what is sticking through the front...
 I have taken a few pics to try to explain better...

The 'washers'


The valve 'pin' with 'needle' sticking through


And the loosely assembled valve, (is this right ?)
'off'position
 

half on position


and 'on' position

 It will turn a little bit more but the spring on the schrader valve pushes it back...
  And also, when it is turned off what is to stop the 'knob' from pushing the schrader valve back down again ?

 I hope that someone can help...

 Many thanks in advance.
 

     Big AL...
I have a friend who is addicted to brake fluid - - - - -He says he can stop anytime he likes !!!!!
        Big AL.......
Quote
Chucker
Hey Al. As for the eccentric position remember "full open" will have the eccentric fully depressed, down inside the valve. Any other position will be higher until it is "full open".

So if the pin is actuating the eccentric when engaged and it goes to the position you want, bingo, you got it.

The brass packing rings; general the "open" or cupped/concave sides of the rings need to face each other to hold or "cup" the packing.

Keep us updated please. Looking forward to a money shot!
Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
olah123
Hi Chucker, thanks for your reply, one more question,
 What stops the valve from turning past the off position to back on again ? as the 'knob' turns past the off position and depresses the valve again !!!
  Many thanks again...

      Big AL...
I have a friend who is addicted to brake fluid - - - - -He says he can stop anytime he likes !!!!!
        Big AL.......
Quote
BobA
Hello Al,

Not Chucker, but I just saw your posts and thought I'd offer some input. Firstly, the cupped packing goes onto the shaft first, and I believe that the cupped part goes in so that the pin on the shaft rides inside of it. The correct way to assemble it will become apparent to you as you do it (IOW- if it's not right, you'll know it - don't force anything). This also relates to your question of why the Schrader valve spring rotates the knob back. Once you have the packing in and tightened properly, the shaft will have enough tension (drag) from the packing to hold it (and the valve) in the open position.

Most importantly, there should be a piece that is installed in the valve (you can see it when you have the shaft out) that looks like this:

275stop.jpg 

When installed, the pin on the shaft is stopped at either end (ON - OFF) by the edges of the semi-circular part of this piece. Without this piece installed, the shaft & knob will not stop at their proper points. Please see that this is present & installed.

BTW - our host carries the correct packing - # 275-1401.

Good luck, and let me know how you make out!


BobA

Quote
BobA
Al,

After thinking it over more, I thought that my above description might be a bit vague & confusing, so I'll try it again in my strongest format - tutorial style!

First, though, I also need to obtain a replacement packing. When I get it, I'll post, with pictures, how to do it. This should happen within a few days. Check back!


BobA


Quote
olah123
BobA wrote:
Al,

After thinking it over more, I thought that my above description might be a bit vague & confusing, so I'll try it again in my strongest format - tutorial style!

First, though, I also need to obtain a replacement packing. When I get it, I'll post, with pictures, how to do it. This should happen within a few days. Check back!


BobA




 Many thanks BobA, that's great, so there is a small piece missing (I thought there might be) as I say I am completely unfamiliar with this kind of valve assembly !!!
 Do you know where I can find this piece ?
  I am looking forward to your tutorial... 
   Again, many thanks for responding, it is very much appreciated...

       Big AL..
I have a friend who is addicted to brake fluid - - - - -He says he can stop anytime he likes !!!!!
        Big AL.......
Quote
BobA
olah123 wrote:

 Many thanks BobA, that's great, so there is a small piece missing (I thought there might be) as I say I am completely unfamiliar with this kind of valve assembly !!!
 Do you know where I can find this piece ?
  I am looking forward to your tutorial... 
   Again, many thanks for responding, it is very much appreciated...

       Big AL..



Al,

This is the piece that we're talking about (circled below):

1005.jpg 


This is part # 275A1191. I looked it up on OCP, and it doesn't appear that Mike has it. This is not surprising, since this is possibly the first time in the 275's 40-year history that anybody's needed one. I would ask Mike anyway, just to be sure. Failing that, the best way to proceed might simply be to see if Mike (or somebody else, using the Classifieds) has a complete valve for sale (or, perhaps, an otherwise damaged donor valve, from which you could take the washer). Just FYI, this valve is for a 275A (not a 275), therefore the part number would be 275B6571. Barring a miracle, I think that it would be quite difficult to find just the Index Washer.

In however you decide to proceed, good luck!


BobA

Quote
Chucker
Hello Al, I have been away for a few days. Looks like BobA has what you need.

Chuck
"Be angry and do not sin. Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still...put your trust in the LORD." Ps. 4/4-5
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
BobA
275A Packing Replacement


OK - let's do this. First, before we start, it's important to clarify something. The semi-circular piece that I described in my last post is called the index washer. It provides the stops at each end of the turn of the valve. It stops the stem at the ON position, and at the OFF position. Now, inside the valve body at the 6 o'clock position is a notch, seen below:

003_1.jpg 

004.jpg 

The tab, which protrudes from the index washer, fits into this notch. Here is a picture of the stem & components (except the packing):

005.jpg 


To assemble the valve stem, first, place the stem so that the pins are at the 6 o'clock position. Then place the index washer into the groove of the stem, as shown, so that the tab is at 12 o' clock.

007.jpg 


Now, place the inner packing gland (cupped washer) with the cup facing the index washer, as shown:

008_1.jpg 


While holding inward pressure on the packing gland (to keep the index washer from falling out), invert the stem so that the eccentric pins are at 12 o'clock and the washer tab is at 6 o'clock. Insert the stem into the valve body. Lightly push it as far in as possible. With your other hand, use your fingers, or perhaps a cleaning needle to move the eccentric block in order to line up the notch in the block with the pin on the valve stem.

008_2.jpg 

Lightly push in & turn the stem back & forth as you are doing this. You will feel the pin drop into the notch. After this happens, turning the stem back & forth will make the eccentric block move up & down, as it should. This means that you've engaged it properly. To verify that you've got the index washer tab properly in it's notch, just turn the valve stem back & forth and feel for the definite stop at each end (ON/OFF). Rotation should be approximately 180 degrees (1/2 turn).

I want to tell you that this is far easier to do than it is to explain, so, don't be discouraged.

Here's how it should now look from the end:

010.jpg 


Next, we install the packing. Push it onto the stem until it seats against the packing gland.

011.jpg 

Now, install the outer packing gland (flat washer).

011_1.jpg 


Now it is time to screw on the packing nut and set it up correctly so it doesn't leak. I have to explain something here. The 275, as well as the later lanterns that are equipped with Schrader valves, can not be done in precisely the same way as the older (conventional) valves. The reason for this is that, on the older valves, the fuel shutoff point in the valve was after the packing (in regards to the fuel flow). That meant that you could simply leave the valve in the OFF position, pump up the pressure, and if there was a leak, you would find out quickly & safely. You didn't have to assemble the lantern, and it was done when not lit.

On lanterns with Schrader valves, the fuel shutoff point is before the packing (at the Schrader valve at the top of the F/A tube). So, as long as that Schrader valve is closed, you could leave the stem out completely, and it still won't leak fuel. This means that the packing can only be checked with the valve in the ON position! Unless you can get a flare cap for the generator outlet of the valve (I don't know if the connection is a standard flare fitting - knowing Coleman, I would bet not!), or unless you want to solder the gas tip orifice shut, this means that the easiest & most convenient way is to adjust it with the lantern in operation! Here is how I did it:

*** IMPORTANT! - When performing the next steps, you could possibly have raw fuel seeping or leaking out within a couple of inches from lit & flaming mantles! DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK! I am NOT responsible for any failure, injury or catastrophe of any kind resulting from this. If you can find a way to pressurize the packing without lighting the lantern, I advise that you do so! ***

When I removed the old packing, I counted the exact number of turns that it took to remove the packing nut. In my case, it took 4 full turns, exactly! When assembling with new packing, I began by turning it in finger tight. This took 1 full turn.

012.jpg 


I then decided to go 2 more turns with the wrench, making a total of 3 full turns. I then turned the valve stem back & forth to check the tension (drag) from the packing. It felt a bit loose compared to how it was originally, so I tightened it 1/6 turn and tried again - still a bit loose. I finally ended up at an additional 3/6 (1/2) turn, for a total of 3-1/2 turns, which felt just about right as far as drag was concerned. I figured that, at least, this would most likely be a point where fuel wouldn't come pouring out dangerously fast when I lit the lantern.

013.jpg 


Time to partially assemble the lantern, so I can test & adjust the packing. Here are the tube fitting and the retaining ring.

013_1.jpg 


Important information! - it has come to my attention from John's post below, that in some of these lanterns, the retaining ring might be a reasonably snug fit on the burner's air tube. On both of my lanterns, the retaining ring is more open and will fall off of the tube when it is turned upright. So...

Check the fit of the ring in the groove of the tube.

IMG_0530.jpg 

If it is a reasonably snug fit, then remove it, put the tube fitting on the air tube, then put the ring back into the groove, as shown:

IMG_0531.jpg 

IMG_0532.jpg 


If, on your lantern, as on mine, the ring is a loose fit, and tends to fall off, then:

Put the retaining ring into the bottom of the female part of the valve assembly.

014.jpg 

015.jpg 


Now, put the tube fitting over the air tube of the burner.

015_1.jpg 

016.jpg 


With either type of ring - insert the air tube into the valve, making sure that it bottoms in the valve. Then, screw the tube fitting into the valve and tighten it. The burner assembly must be held tight in the valve and must not be able to move. If it is loose, something is wrong. In this case, it was fine!


016_1.jpg 


Install the generator & tighten the jamb nut.

017.jpg 


Pump it up & light it. Immediately check for any leakage or seeping at the packing nut and valve stem.

018.jpg 

I was lucky in that there was absolutely no leaking at all! It was adjusted just fine. Ran it 30 minutes with no problems!

019.jpg 

If there is any leakage, tighten the packing nut 1/6 turn at a time, until the leaking stops. Of course, if the leakage is severe, shut the lantern down immediately, and snug the packing nut down before re-lighting.

OK, time to re-assemble the lantern!

Loosen the tube fitting completely and pull the burner out of the valve. Watch out for that retaining ring! You can leave the generator in place. First, install the base rest (collar). Position the "Model 275A" section directly below the valve stem.

020.jpg 

Now place the capital (that's what Coleman calls it, don't blame me!) on top of the collar, as shown

021.jpg 

Now place the frame assembly into the capital, lining up the appropriate holes. Screw on & tighten the frame nut.

022.jpg 

Re-attach the burner assembly, as I did, above, for the test - this time being careful to guide the generator into the appropriate hole in the air tube. Be sure that the air tube is bottomed in the valve!

022_2.jpg 

Tighten the tube fitting. The entire burner should be engaged solidly & unable to move at all.

023.jpg 


Attach the knob.

025.jpg 


Re-assemble the globe, vent, & ball nut.

026.jpg 


Ran it for another hour and a half. Burns great, and the valve is as dry as a bone!

030.jpg 

031.jpg 

032.jpg 



Hope this helps!


BobA






Quote
Lanterndude
Excellent "how to" there BobA!

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
WYSIWYG
Very nice Bob. 

I think the Ring you placed in the bottom of the air tube mounting hole belongs in the grove at the bottom of the air tube. that way the air tube will drop down a little more and the slot will fit in the key, indexing the airtube so it wont twist.  Also then the generator tip will be up in the air tube and not partly out and having a air leak at the point where the generator enters the air tube.

At least that is how they are on my 7 275's when I took them apart.

There should be a ring in the grove here

[016] 
John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
Quote
BobA
First, thanks guys for the kind words!

WYSIWYG wrote:

I think the Ring you placed in the bottom of the air tube mounting hole belongs in the grove at the bottom of the air tube. that way the air tube will drop down a little more and the slot will fit in the key, indexing the airtube so it wont twist.  Also then the generator tip will be up in the air tube and not partly out and having a air leak at the point where the generator enters the air tube.

At least that is how they are on my 7 275's when I took them apart.

There should be a ring in the grove here

[016] 


John,

It actually ends up being the same thing. At least, that is the case on my two lanterns. One is a 275 made in 11/75, and the other is a 275A made in 4/83. So, one from near the start of production, and one near the end of production. I have always believed that to be a reasonable representation of the entire line. But, maybe I'm wrong - Lord knows, it happens enough! [biggrin]

Let me ask you, when you put the retaining ring onto the air tube, is it not a loose fit? I can't get either of mine to stay firmly in that groove - can you?

In any case, this is why I say "be sure that the air tube is bottomed in the valve". At that point, the ring is aligned with the groove in the air tube. As you correctly point out, the tab in the valve will engage the slot in the air tube, preventing twisting. The portion of the valve, where the ring sits, is tapered. Tightening the fitting pushes the ring down along the taper, closing the ends together and clamping the ring into the groove of the air tube.

If you want to verify what I'm saying, take a pencil and draw a line on the air tube, right against the fitting (when installed). Then loosen it and remove the burner. Put the burner back in without the ring and screw in the fitting. The line will be in the same place. Then re-assemble everything exactly as I said. It will still be in the same place. This proves that the tube is fully bottomed.

Also, when disassembling the burner on mine, after removing the fitting, I have to forcibly pull up the burner, which gives the "click" as the ring releases from the groove. After assembly, I also pull up on the burner, very forcibly, to make sure that it is not coming apart!
Trust me, I don't want that thing coming apart, especially when lit!!!    [absolutely]

I would definitely be interested in hearing if any of this is different in your lanterns, than in mine! Please let me know, either way!

Thanks,


BobA



Quote
olah123
WOW... BobA,
 Thank you so much for that very detailed tutorial...I now know exactly what I need and how to fix it...
  A massive thanks to you and WYSIWYG for your input and your time...FANTASTIC...

    All the best...

      Big AL...
I have a friend who is addicted to brake fluid - - - - -He says he can stop anytime he likes !!!!!
        Big AL.......
Quote
WYSIWYG
On mine when I lift the air tube the ring stays on the tube and the nut is captured. And yes the ring is a little loose but not so loose that it comes off easily
John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
Quote
BobA
WYSIWYG wrote:
On mine when I lift the air tube the ring stays on the tube and the nut is captured. And yes the ring is a little loose but not so loose that it comes off easily


Hi John,

That is kind of strange. You say that you have seven of these? And they all act the same way? Both of mine, if I put the ring in the groove and turn the burner upright, it may or may not stay on the tube. If it does, give it the slightest shake and it falls off - and there's no way it could hold the weight of the fitting under any circumstances.

Thanks to your input, I'm going to modify the above procedure a bit.

Thank you very much, John!


BobA


Quote
BobA
olah123 wrote:
WOW... BobA,
 Thank you so much for that very detailed tutorial...I now know exactly what I need and how to fix it...
  A massive thanks to you and WYSIWYG for your input and your time...FANTASTIC...

    All the best...

      Big AL...


Al,

You're very welcome!

After you complete the job, please don't forget to post back with a photo or two showing it burning brightly!

Good luck!


BobA

Quote
Rhubarb
I have one complete 275 and one 275A burner, on both, the circlip was pretty tight on the groove of the air tube, in effect, capturing the fitting onto the air tube. Bob, maybe if you give the circlip a bit of a squeeze with a pair of squeezers, it will hold the fitting in place.

It seems like your way is working just fine, though. If it isn't broken, don't fix it.

PS. I've heard some folks refer to squeezers as pliers. Just an FYI.

Awesome tutorial as usual!

Will you cover the earlier 275 valve as well? Also setting up the Schrader valve.
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
Quote
BobA
Rhubarb wrote:
It seems like your way is working just fine, though. If it isn't broken, don't fix it.


Amen to that, Andy! My procedure works just fine, as is, for me. However, I'm glad that John, and now you, have jumped in to let me know that not all of these lanterns have very loose retaining rings. Since both of mine are like that, I wasn't aware of it. Always best to cover all your bases!

Quote:
PS. I've heard some folks refer to squeezers as pliers. Just an FYI.


[biggrin]   Very good, Andy!


Thanks,

BobA

Quote
BobA
I want everyone to know that I've edited my "mini-tutorial" above, to reflect the handling of both loose and snug retaining rings.

Also, John - I remembered that I have a spare 275 burner in my parts box. So, I decided to check it out, and it turns out that it has one of the snug-fitting rings, so I was able to better update my post, with pictures of it!

Thanks again!


BobA
Quote
BobA
Rhubarb wrote:
Will you cover the earlier 275 valve as well? Also setting up the Schrader valve.


Hi Andy,

Sorry about my previous reply. It appears that you were in the process of editing your post at the same time that I was replying to it! So I didn't see (or reply to) the above question.

Since you asked, I went ahead and used my spare valve and am putting together a little tutorial on that!

BobA


Quote
WYSIWYG
Bob,

I think about how they must have assembled them on the line and I would think that having the burner asy with the nut captured by the ring would be efficient.  Just pick up the part stick it in the hole and spin down the nut. 

But I wasn't there so I'm just guessing.
John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
Quote
BobA
WYSIWYG wrote:
Bob,

I think about how they must have assembled them on the line and I would think that having the burner asy with the nut captured by the ring would be efficient.  Just pick up the part stick it in the hole and spin down the nut. 


Sounds reasonable to me!


Quote:
But I wasn't there so I'm just guessing.


Me, neither. But I'm happier now that I've got both ways covered in the tutorial. I don't want anybody having the slightest chance of that burner not being secured!

Thanks again, John!


BobA

Quote
BobA
275 Valve Service


I was asked, by Andy, about covering the 275 valve. So, I put together this little piece. Here, I will be working on a spare valve, so it is not on a lantern, and therefore, there will be some necessary limitations. For example - I won't be able to show the adjustment of the packing. But, I will refer you to the above 275A tutorial for that procedure, since it is essentially the same thing. Also, I will not be installing any new parts - which, of course, you would be.

Since both adjusting the packing & adjusting the F/A tube require that the valve be fully assembled, I'm going to undertake these as two separate operations. First, I will deal with packing replacement.

OK - here are some views of the 275 valve:

001.jpg 

002.jpg 

003.jpg 

As you can see, it is very similar to the 275A valve, with some differences. First, the 275 uses an external indexing system (the silver bracket wrapped around the valve). Also, this valve uses an F/A rod, in addition to the Schrader valve. Because of that, operationally, this valve has three positions - OFF, LIGHT, & ON. This differs from the 275A which has two positions - OFF & ON.

Let's get started. It is my understanding that most of these valves retain the Index Assembly with an "E-Clip". I'm not sure why, but this one uses a pin & washer to do this.

004.jpg 

So, first, we punch out the pin (or remove the clip if you have that)...

005.jpg 

006.jpg 

and remove the washer.

007.jpg 

Remove the index assembly.

008.jpg 

Next we must remove the index spring. This is difficult to remove, and must be worked off the valve stem using pliers, as shown.

009.jpg 

010.jpg 

Loosen & remove the packing nut, counting the number of turns that it takes to remove it.

013.jpg 

014.jpg 

Pull out the valve stem with the old packing. This will take some work, and perhaps the application of some heat to accomplish.

015.jpg 

These are all of the components of the stem. You can see some differences as compared with the 275A valve. This is because of the external index system, rather than the A's index washer. The primary differences to the 275A are:

1) There is no index washer &
2) Both packing glands are flat washers (no cupped washer on this one)

016.jpg 

At this point, you'll want to clean the old packing and crud from inside the valve body, and from the valve stem. A small brass brush will take care of the valve body, and some #0000 steel wool for the stem. Remember to go lightly as we don't want to remove metal, just old packing & crud. When done, we can reassemble the valve:

Insert the valve stem into the valve body. Turn it back & forth, while moving the eccentric block up & down, in order to line up the notch in the block with the pin on the stem. You'll feel the pin drop into the notch. At this point, turning the stem back & forth will make the eccentric block move up & down, as it should.

029.jpg 

Now place one of the packing gland washers over the stem and into the body.

030.jpg 

Now comes the new packing...

031.jpg 

followed by the other packing gland. Press in until it stops.

032.jpg 

Thread on the packing nut.

033.jpg 

Now here is where things get a bit difficult. Since this is a spare valve I'm working on, I can't show the process of actually setting the new packing. You can refer to the above 275A procedure, because you have to, basically, do exactly the same thing. The problem is, on this valve, you have the index assembly to deal with. To adjust the packing, you have to remove the index assembly every time you want to turn the packing nut. Here is what I would suggest. Turn in the packing nut to within 1/2 - 1/4 turn of the number of turns you counted when you removed it. For example, if it took 3-1/2 turns to remove it, then turn it in 3 turns. Put the knob on & turn the stem back & forth. Feel the tension (drag) on the shaft. If it turns too easily, go another 1/6 turn & try again. If it is hard to turn, back it off 1/6 turn. Continue until it feels about right. Now re-install the index spring onto the stem & push it all the way on until it stops, as shown:

034.jpg 

At this point, I refer you to the 275A procedure for partially assembling the lantern to adjust the packing. The only thing is that, in order to light the lantern, you will have to temporarily install the index assembly & the knob...

035.jpg 

036.jpg 

 so you can set the valve at the proper positions (OFF,LIGHT, ON), then remove it to inspect & adjust the packing. A much more difficult & tedious procedure than for the 275A. I'll repeat the warning about doing this:

*** IMPORTANT! - When doing this, you could possibly have raw fuel seeping or leaking out within a couple of inches from lit & flaming mantles! DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK! I am NOT responsible for any failure, injury or catastrophe of any kind resulting from this. If you can find a way to pressurize the packing without lighting the lantern, I advise that you do so! ***

Once you have the packing adjusted properly, replace the index assembly, followed by the washer.

037.jpg 

Now, replace the pin and use the punch to insert it to the proper depth, as shown.

038.jpg 



---------------------------------------



At this point, we'll move on to the F/A tube. Unscrew it from the valve body.

017.jpg 

018.jpg 

Using a Schrader valve tool, unscrew the valve from the tube.

019.jpg 

020.jpg 

Now, remove the F/A rod & spring

021.jpg 

The dismantled F/A tube:

022.jpg 

Clean the F/A tube thoroughly. Pay particular attention to the smooth seat just below the threads, here, inside the tube. Tough to see in the photo. But it is very important that it be cleaned without scratching or gouging, as this is where the Schrader valve seats & seals against the tube. I usually use a combination of carb cleaner spray & scraping very lightly with a jeweler's screwdriver. Again be very gentle & do not scratch this surface!

023.jpg 

This is the fuel pickup, at the other end of the F/A tube. It must also be cleaned. I usually spray carb cleaner through it, then ream it out gently with the F/A rod, and then spray carb cleaner again. Be careful not to bend the rod when you do this!

024.jpg 

Clean the rod by brushing lightly with #0000 steel wool, then wipe with clean rag.

Place the spring on the rod, then insert the rod into the F/A tube.

025.jpg 

026.jpg 

Screw in the new Schrader valve & tighten it snugly with the tool.

027.jpg 

028.jpg 

Now, we'll adjust the F/A tube. Screw it into the valve body until you feel some resistance. You might want to use some threadlocker if the fit is loose. We need the tube to maintain its position, once adjusted.

039.jpg 

Set the valve to the OFF position.

040.jpg 

The rod should be blocking the orifice at the pickup. It might be flush with the orifice, or it may protrude a bit, as shown. As long as the orifice is blocked, that's fine.

041.jpg 

Now, place your mouth over the generator outlet and draw a suction. Turn the F/A tube in until you are able to suck air through. Then, slowly and carefully back the F/A tube out just to the point where you can no longer suck air. Then back the tube out further - another 3/8 turn. Verify that you can NOT suck air through the valve.

Turn the knob to the straight up position, and the eccentric block should be at its highest point.

042.jpg 

043.jpg 

Turn the knob to the first detent, as shown. This is the LIGHT position.

044.jpg 

Using your mouth, draw a suction as before. Now, you should be able to suck air thru the valve. The rod should still be blocking the pickup orifice as shown.

045.jpg 

Now, turn the knob fully to the left until it stops.

046.jpg 

This is the ON position. You should still be able to suck air, and the bottom of the F/A tube should look like this:

047.jpg 

048.jpg 

You can see that the stepped (small diameter) portion of the rod is in the orifice, which will allow full fuel flow through it.

This should be straightforward. However, I'll just say - if, when following the above procedure, you can suck air when you shouldn't be able to, then turn the tube back out (CCW) a small fraction of a turn & try again. If you can't suck air when you should be able to, turn the tube in (CW) a small amount! Then go back & re-check all positions, making sure all conditions are met.


Good Luck,


BobA

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Lanterndude
BobA, another excellent write-up, how too.

Bob the following is just a suggestion/my opinion and please it is not to over-shadow your perfect write-ups.

Just an added thought here, it's good that you point out that during testing the lantern out, lighting it with fuel, etc., an individual will be performing this task at their own risk.....but (as a suggested alternative) one can always test it out with fuel "without" lighting it if they wish to do so?

Prior to actually lighting the lantern, once everything is assembled with fuel in the Fount/Tank and ready to test, that is without the Generator and Air Tubes, mantles and such.....one can just apply pressure to the Fount/Tank then turn the Valve knob to ON or Light (which ever model is being tested) to see if fuel is actually coming out of the Valve assembly and also not leaking any where else (such as the Valve Knob, packing, etc. and the area around the Fount/Tanks F/A Valve insertion point, etc.?

If there are any leaks detected then, at this point, one can just tighten down areas that are necessary, etc. once everything checks out fine and all-the Air tubes and mantles can be added/assembled and actual lighting test can be performed?

Again Bob, execellent post on both models 275 & 275A these (how too's) will definitely help out many members here (as well as myself!).

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

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BobA
Lanterndude wrote:
BobA, another excellent write-up, how too.

Bob the following is just a suggestion/my opinion and please it is not to over-shadow your perfect write-ups.


Thank you very much, LD. But my work is certainly not perfect, and can always be improved. So, I appreciate people's thoughts.

Quote:

Just an added thought here, it's good that you point out that during testing the lantern out, lighting it with fuel, etc., an individual will be performing this task at their own risk.....but (as a suggested alternative) one can always test it out with fuel "without" lighting it if they wish to do so?

Prior to actually lighting the lantern, once everything is assembled with fuel in the Fount/Tank and ready to test, that is without the Generator and Air Tubes, mantles and such.....one can just apply pressure to the Fount/Tank then turn the Valve knob to ON or Light (which ever model is being tested) to see if fuel is actually coming out of the Valve assembly and also not leaking any where else (such as the Valve Knob, packing, etc. and the area around the Fount/Tanks F/A Valve insertion point, etc.?

If there are any leaks detected then, at this point, one can just tighten down areas that are necessary, etc. once everything checks out fine and all-the Air tubes and mantles can be added/assembled and actual lighting test can be performed?


The only problems with this, are that, without the generator in place, fuel is going to come pouring out of the thing! It will make a real mess! Also, you appear to be assuming that any leak from the packing is going to be huge. In fact, most of the time, it will just be seepage, which would be camouflaged by the fuel pouring out of the valve. Besides that, without the generator, there would be no back pressure (from the gas tip restricting the flow), so the packing would probably never leak under those conditions, anyway. The best way, in my view, would be to have a spare gas tip (or gen), and solder the orifice shut. Then, one could pressurize it safely, without lighting, and leave it for a half-hour or so, to be sure of no leakage!

Quote:

Again Bob, execellent post on both models 275 & 275A these (how too's) will definitely help out many members here (as well as myself!).


Thank you very much!


BobA

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Rhubarb
Thanks Bob! Very comprehensive and informative.
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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